Your Helicopter Parent is Ruining Things for You

helicopter parent

Have you ever heard of a helicopter parent?

Well, these are overprotective, overbearing, slightly obsessive parents who take an excessive interest in the lives of their children.

Many people may think that being a little overinvested in a child’s life is pretty typical when raising toddlers, adolescents, and, in a stretch, maybe even those that are college-aged. What if, though, these overbearing parents helicopter their way into the workforce. This is an actual thing that happens.

Parents are making it their business to usher their children into their careers. They are assisting in interviews, requesting your benefits, and consulting with managers on your job affairs. Here’s something that shouldn’t surprise you, but this behavior is frowned upon.

According to a recent OfficeTeam survey, more than one in three (35%) senior managers said they find it annoying when parents are involved in their kids’ search for work. Another one-third (34%) of respondents prefer mom and dad stay out of the job hunt, but would let it slide. Only 29% said this parental guidance is not a problem.

OfficeTeam asked managers to recount the strangest thing that these helicopter parents have done for their job-seeking children and as unbelievable as it may seem, here’s a little of what they’ve encountered:

  • “The candidate opened his laptop and had his mother Skype in for the interview.”
  • “One parent asked if she could do the interview for her child because he had somewhere else to be.”
  • “A father asked us to pay his son a higher salary.”
  • “A job seeker was texting his parent the questions I was asking during the interview and waiting for a response.”

Parents, let’s apply a strong “no!” to all of this. If there must be a firm limit to your hovering, here it is.

When entering the job market, this is the time when adults are not only suggested to but are required to stand on their own two feet if they’d like to stand any chance of survival in the workforce.

As a parent, if you have to get or keep the job for your child then you should be doing that job, and not your child.

Children of helicopter parents, draw the line here. Allowing your parents to have too much involvement in your career can ultimately lead to you having no career at all. Employers want to know that you’re self-sufficient. Besides, if they wanted to hire your parents, they would’ve.

Helicopter parents, right about now would probably be a good time to fly away.

Your Helicopter Parent is Ruining Things for You

helicopter parent

Have you ever heard of a helicopter parent?

Well, these are overprotective, overbearing, slightly obsessive parents who take an excessive interest in the lives of their children.

Many people may think that being a little overinvested in a child’s life is pretty typical when raising toddlers, adolescents, and, in a stretch, maybe even those that are college-aged. What if, though, these overbearing parents helicopter their way into the workforce. This is an actual thing that happens.

Parents are making it their business to usher their children into their careers. They are assisting in interviews, requesting your benefits, and consulting with managers on your job affairs. Here’s something that shouldn’t surprise you, but this behavior is frowned upon.

According to a recent OfficeTeam survey, more than one in three (35%) senior managers said they find it annoying when parents are involved in their kids’ search for work. Another one-third (34%) of respondents prefer mom and dad stay out of the job hunt, but would let it slide. Only 29% said this parental guidance is not a problem.

OfficeTeam asked managers to recount the strangest thing that these helicopter parents have done for their job-seeking children and as unbelievable as it may seem, here’s a little of what they’ve encountered:

  • “The candidate opened his laptop and had his mother Skype in for the interview.”
  • “One parent asked if she could do the interview for her child because he had somewhere else to be.”
  • “A father asked us to pay his son a higher salary.”
  • “A job seeker was texting his parent the questions I was asking during the interview and waiting for a response.”

Parents, let’s apply a strong “no!” to all of this. If there must be a firm limit to your hovering, here it is.

When entering the job market, this is the time when adults are not only suggested to but are required to stand on their own two feet if they’d like to stand any chance of survival in the workforce.

As a parent, if you have to get or keep the job for your child then you should be doing that job, and not your child.

Children of helicopter parents, draw the line here. Allowing your parents to have too much involvement in your career can ultimately lead to you having no career at all. Employers want to know that you’re self-sufficient. Besides, if they wanted to hire your parents, they would’ve.

Helicopter parents, right about now would probably be a good time to fly away.

Wozniak and Kawasaki Set to Keynote at NextCon16 – Look for ‘Ah-Ha Moments’

Steve Wozniak - NextCon speaker

Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple, will keynote at NextCon16 in November

If you attend just one business conference before the end of 2016, put NextCon at the top of your shortlist.

You’ll get to see high-octane speakers like Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple, and tech superstar Guy Kawasaki — not to mention executives from LinkedIn and Google.

NextCon16 is a conference for entrepreneurs, small business owners, tech professionals and more.  It’s all about building a business, managing it well, marketing it and, of course, profiting from it.

NextCon, which takes place November 14-16, 2016, is being hosted by Nextiva, a cloud-based unified communications service.

Nextiva itself has grown rapidly over the past few years. So the company executives understand well the challenges of growth.  That experience is part of what motivated this conference.

According to Yaniv Masjedi, Nextiva vice-president of marketing, who spoke with Small Business Trends in a telephone interview, the company didn’t want it to be the typical brand conference focused on products and services.

Instead, Nextiva executives wanted the attention to be on helping all businesses grow and prosper — regardless of whether they are Nextiva customers.

By holding the conference in Arizona, Nextiva also wants to spotlight the thriving tech and business scene there. As Masjedi says, Arizona’s business environment has been instrumental in Nextiva’s own growth.

NextCon keynote speaker lineup

‘Ah-ha’ Moments

Nextiva promises that attendees will experience some genuine “ah-ha” moments. In other words, go with the idea of getting breakthrough ideas.  Look for Ah-ha opportunities like these:

1. Professional Growth Insights

One ah-ha moment opportunity will likely occur on day one. It consists of a “fireside chat” with Darin Brown, CTO of Angie’s List; Neill Feather, president of Sitelock; and Carol Roth, TV host and CNBC contributor.

These entrepreneurs and business leaders will share how they overcame challenges and drove growth.

2. Real-world Marketing That Works

Speakers get down to brass tacks on day two. You’ll hear real-world advice about paid search, brand building, SEO, social media, customer service and more. Other topics include raising capital, women in business, sales and data analytics.

3. Real Life Business Success Stories

Day three is where local business owners talk candidly about how they started and grew their businesses.

Another “bonus” ah-ha moment will likely occur when Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak takes the stage for his keynote.

According to Masjedi, Wozniak will share what it took to create Apple’s culture of innovation, and what other businesses can do to emulate it.

NextCon16 — an ‘Everyone’ Conference

NextCon16 is an “everyone” conference. It’s designed for anyone to get value regardless of role, industry or company size. Students are welcome, too, said Masjedi.

At $499, the price is right for small business, particularly considering NextCon16 spans three full days. Plus, it’s being held in Scottsdale, Arizona, which, in November should be pleasant  just as the weather starts to turn bad elsewhere.

Most sessions will be non-product specific.

“There are tracks for Nextiva partners and customers but that’s not the goal,” Masjedi said. “The bulk of the sessions will apply to any business professional.”

Sessions are divided into four tracks:  building, managing, promoting and profiting in business.

Co-hosted along with the event will be the Rule Breaker Awards ceremony.

NextCon16 takes place at the Talking Stick Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona, Nov. 14-16, 2016. Learn more at: nextcon.nextiva.com.

 

Steve Wozniak image credit: Nichollas Harrison [GFDL CC BY-SA 3.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons

This article, “Wozniak and Kawasaki Set to Keynote at NextCon16 – Look for ‘Ah-Ha Moments’” was first published on Small Business Trends

The Stark Reality about Entrepreneurs of Color

Entrepreneurs

The stark reality about entrepreneurs of color is that their brilliance, ingenuity, and grit are boundless.

Values Partnerships leads a nationwide casting tour focused on bringing more diverse ideas and voices to ABC’s hit show Shark Tank.

In 2016, we hosted 12 casting calls in nine U.S. cities, engaging thousands of entrepreneurs. Incredible businesses led by black, Hispanic, women, veterans, and other entrepreneurs from communities underrepresented in the business world pitched to appear on Season 8 of Shark Tank.

Entrepreneurs such as Make Music Count CEO Marcus Blackwell Jr. in Atlanta and Spicy Dark Cosmetics CEO Julia Clavo in New Orleans pitched their businesses.

According to the latest stats from the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), entrepreneurship is on the rise in communities of color.

Minority-owned firms in the U.S. rose from 5.8 million in 2007 to 8.0 million in 2012; an increase from 22% to 29% of the total number of U.S. firms. However, while this is good news, 70% of U.S. businesses are owned or led by white men. That number increases even more when looking at businesses that employ more than one person.

This reality meant that for us, hosting casting calls for Shark Tank was not enough. Appearing on ABC’s Shark Tank is an amazing opportunity for entrepreneurs; just ask Sarah Ribner of PiperWai who pitched at our casting call at the NAACP Convention in 2015, appeared on Season 7, and struck a deal with Barbara Corcoran. However, we wanted to do more for the entrepreneurs at our events.

With the full support of Shark Tank and its producer, Mark Burnett, we endeavored to add value for the entrepreneurs at our events and the ecosystems that support them. At each of our casting calls, we offered a pitch prep session with tips gleaned from hearing thousands of pitches. Recognizing that access to capital remains the No. 1 one issue for minority entrepreneurs, in each city, we also organized an access to capital discussion with local funders, including banks, venture capital firms, angel investors, and local governments.

We partnered with national organizations such as Walker’s Legacy, a national, women in business collective, and local organizations including Silicon Harlem, to provide free resources for entrepreneurs at each of our events.

We connected with MBDA Business Centers around the nation and co-authored a pitch prep toolkit with the Nasdaq Entrepreneurial Center and U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The toolkit was provided to entrepreneurs as a free resource prior to each casting call.

The goal was to put entrepreneurs in the best position to pitch their businesses, and for entrepreneurs to leave our casting calls better than they came, whether or not they moved forward with the show.

Entrepreneurship has the ability to transform communities through innovative problem solving and employment. We took our Shark Tank casting calls to many of the communities that need this transformation most. Holding casting calls in southeast Washington, DC at the Anacostia Arts Center, in The Bronx, NY with NY Assemblymember Michael Blake, and other communities with great potential showed us that innovation is not limited to certain zip codes. The resources should not be either.

As the U.S. economy continues to recover from the “Great Recession” and capital markets loosen, ensuring that Americans from every region and community can fully participate in the economy is imperative.

With the support of Shark Tank and its Producer Mark Burnett, we are committed to this work and to ensuring the faces and voices appearing on networks like ABC reflect the diversity of the viewing audience.

The stark reality about entrepreneurs from communities of color is that they are brilliant and deserve our support.

Catch the Season 8 premiere of Shark Tank, Friday, Sept. 23 9/8c on ABC.

Brandon Andrews is a senior consultant at Values Partnerships. He leads a nationwide casting tour for ABC’s Shark Tank. View his commentary on business and politics at www.brandonandrews.me Website – www.brandonandrews.me  Twitter – www.twitter.com/brandontalk IG – www.instagram.com/yesbrandon Facebook – www.facebook.com/mr.brandonandrews Snap – @brandontalk

Black Pastor Sends Clinton Blackface Tweet In Support Of Trump, Stands By His Message

Clinton blackface

Televangelist and NOW Television Network CEO Pastor Rev. Mark Burns caused a social media firestorm by tweeting a post with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in blackface. Burns is a prominent Trump adviser, a proponent of the “prosperity gospel,” and the man who delivered the most partisan convention prayer in modern history, according to Think Progress. Burns took down the post and went on a media circuit to apologize saying he should have used a different methodology to express his views.

On News One Now, Burns told Host and Managing Editor Roland S. Martin: “I thought the picture represented the message that the state of blacks has been used by the Democratic Party and by many cases are not operating at the same level that other ethnic groups are in this country,” said Burns. “And yet we have been voting in masses. Yes, we have progressed a lot; we have gained a lot but we are still not moving at the same speed that other ethnic groups are in this country. I believe that the voting bloc of the African American community it already belongs, at least in the mind of the Democrats; already belong to the Democratic Party. I truly apologized for the offensive blackface image of that cartoon and the depiction of the blackface is offensive by itself. As an African American man in America, I don’t stand by anyone portraying themselves in the blackface, but the message I intended, I still stand behind.”

Blacks Have It So Bad

Burns’s message for why African Americans should vote for Trump is basically the same as the one Trump has been making to largely white audiences at his rallies—if black people have it so bad (they’re poor, uneducated, unemployed and live in violence) what do they have to lose by voting for Trump and seeing what happens.

During an appearance on Fox News, Burn said “the real offense” is that many minority families in America “don’t know where their next meal is coming from.” On MSNBC, he stated: “millions of African Americans are on welfare, [millions] of African Americans are on food stamps… we are not at the promise land that Dr. King spoke about.”

Trump Rates at Zero Percent Among Black Voters

Burns’s faith in Trump appears to ignore the fact that the Republican Party has stonewalled America’s first black president over the past eight years. Since Obama took the Oval Office and Republicans gained majority control of the Senate and House of Representatives, The United States Congress has been locked in partisan warfare and political gridlock, which political pundits say makes it the least productive and most polarized legislative branch in American history.

African Americans aren’t buying what Trump is peddling. A new Public Policy Poll showed the Republican presidential nominee’s favorability rating among African American voters at zero percent.

Hillary In Blackface Courtesy of Think Progress