2016 Best Companies for Diversity: Exelon Corporation

exelon

CEO: Christopher M. Crane

 

The 50 companies on this year’s Best Companies for Diversity list represents brands that recognize the value of cultivating an inclusive environment, driven by company leadership through senior management and the board of directors, as shown in the BE Registry of Corporate Directors. Some are taking a step further to engage employees during turbulent and confusing sociopolitical times.

Here, we’d like to highlight Exelon Corp., an energy provider based in Chicago, and what it’s doing to push forward and nurture diversity and inclusion.

In 2014, Exelon’s purchases with certified diverse suppliers totaled more than $1 billion. Though this was one way the company displayed diversity and inclusion, they also utilize Employee Resource Groups. They currently have nine ERGs that more than 8,500 employees are involved with.

Exelon also recognizes how retaining women is vital for the company’s success. In 2015, the company hosted a Women’s Leadership Development Summit, where more than 200 male and female leaders shared candid dialogue focused on developing and retaining women, and the importance of doing so for the company’s success.

According to Exelon’s website, in 2014, more than 60% of Exelon’s $31.5 million in grants supported organizations, programs, or events consistent with their diversity and inclusion initiatives.

2016 Best Companies for Diversity: Exelon Corporation

exelon

CEO: Christopher M. Crane

 

The 50 companies on this year’s Best Companies for Diversity list represents brands that recognize the value of cultivating an inclusive environment, driven by company leadership through senior management and the board of directors, as shown in the BE Registry of Corporate Directors. Some are taking a step further to engage employees during turbulent and confusing sociopolitical times.

Here, we’d like to highlight Exelon Corp., an energy provider based in Chicago, and what it’s doing to push forward and nurture diversity and inclusion.

In 2014, Exelon’s purchases with certified diverse suppliers totaled more than $1 billion. Though this was one way the company displayed diversity and inclusion, they also utilize Employee Resource Groups. They currently have nine ERGs that more than 8,500 employees are involved with.

Exelon also recognizes how retaining women is vital for the company’s success. In 2015, the company hosted a Women’s Leadership Development Summit, where more than 200 male and female leaders shared candid dialogue focused on developing and retaining women, and the importance of doing so for the company’s success.

According to Exelon’s website, in 2014, more than 60% of Exelon’s $31.5 million in grants supported organizations, programs, or events consistent with their diversity and inclusion initiatives.

2016 Best Companies for Diversity: Toyota

Toyota

North America CEO: James Lentz

 

The 50 companies on this year’s Best Companies for Diversity list represent brands that recognize the value in cultivating an inclusive environment, driven by company leadership through senior management and the board of directors (as shown in the B.E. Registry of Corporate Directors). Some are also taking a step further to engage employees during turbulent and confusing socio-political times.

Here we’d like to highlight automotive manufacturer Toyota Motor North America Inc., and what it’s doing to push forward and nurture diversity and inclusion. Toyota is also a member of the Billion Dollar Roundtable—an advocacy organization that recognizes corporations spending at least $1 billion with minority and woman-owned suppliers.

Toyota has a corporate social code of conduct and guiding principle that is for all of its employees. It is called the Toyota Way and is supported by two main pillars: “Continuous Improvement” and “Respect for People.”

To ensure that African Americans are in the pipeline for management promotions, Toyota North America’s African American Collaborative Business Partnering Group is engaged with mentoring and supporting team members to help prepare them for advancement opportunities. An annual Diversity & Inclusion Assessment holds executives accountable for the effectiveness of such initiatives. And the Morale Survey includes questions to gauge the state of the work culture and work environment around respect and treatment of team members.

Additionally, Toyota North America strives to work with diverse suppliers. As a member of the Billion Dollar Roundtable, it spent more than $1 billion with African American suppliers.