Powerful Quotes From Black Women Bosses on International Women’s Day

International Women's Day (Bozoma Saint John, Head of Global Marketing for iTunes & Beats Music and one of Black Enterprise’s “Most Powerful Women in Business.” Photo credit: Apple, Inc.)

 

This year’s International Women’s Day is a special one. Not only are women being recognized and celebrated for their strengths, which the holiday has aimed to do since its inception in 1911, but this year it corresponds with the “A Day Without Women” boycott, in which protesters around the nation are uniting for a one-day demonstration to remind people of the valuable contributions women make to the workforce.

Recent research by the Center for American Progress shows that if all paid female workers simultaneously took one day off from work, it would cost the U.S. nearly $21 billion in gross domestic product (GDP). The study, entitled A Day in the U.S. Economy Without Women, also found that women’s labor contributes $7.6 trillion to the U.S. each year.

In the U.S., women make up almost 47% of the workforce, according to United States Department of Labor’s statistics. In 2016, the agency reported that there were about 10.2 million black women in the labor force in 2015, representing one in seven women in the labor force. Of those, 9.3 million were employed, particularly in management and professional occupations.

According to the agency, black women currently earn more than ever and continue to be more likely than other women to participate in the labor force. In 2015, six in 10 black women were employed or actively looking for work—but the wage gap is still stark. The DOL stated that the annual earnings of black women are nearly 20% less than white, non-Hispanic women, and 40% less than white, non-Hispanic men.

There’s no doubt that a black woman sitting in a boardroom, standing on the Senate floor, steering a corporation, or changing the face of what’s shown on television is a vital part of this country’s evolution. Therefore, it’s only fitting that on this day we share some meaningful and empowering quotes from black, female bosses, who continuously show us what it means to make bold moves that initiate substantial change.

Whether you’re protesting today by marching or taking the day off, or you’re demonstrating your solidarity with the A Day Without Women cause by choosing to only shop at small, minority-owned, and minority-women-owned businesses or wearing red, words of wisdom from these unapologetic, female trailblazers will remind you of the enormous value black women bring to the workplace. Today is about having pride in the power of womanhood, and these quotes are sure to inspire and encourage you to speak up, speak out, work harder, and live boldly.

 

On Speaking Up:

 

“I didn’t learn to be quiet when I had an opinion. The reason they knew who I was is because I told them.” ― Ursula Burns, Chairman, Xerox 

“You get in life what you have the courage to ask for.” ― Oprah Winfrey, CEO, Harpo, Inc.

 

On Maintaining Authenticity in the Face of Limitations:

 

“If they don’t give you a seat at the table, bring a folding chair.” ―Shirley Chisholm, former congresswoman representing New York’s 12th Congressional District and the first black woman elected to Congress

“Never compromise who you are personally to become who wish to be professionally. The most expensive real estate you’ll ever own resides between your two ears; be selfish about what you allow to happen on that property.” Janice Bryant Howroyd, CEO, ACT-1 Group

“One of the things I discovered a long time ago was that it’s a waste of energy to spend a lot of time agonizing over how people will receive you. I’m not suggesting that you barrel through life willy-nilly, but I am suggesting that we stop trying to allow other people’s potential prejudices, let alone actual prejudices, to paralyze us.” – Michele Roberts, executive director, National Basketball Players Association

“As you move up—as you engage more and more people in the company and take on broader roles—this idea of ‘looking the part’ becomes more and more of a challenge when you don’t look the part. But there’s nothing I can do, or wanted to do, about being a black female—I kind of like both of those things. So, at the end of the day, the people who were around me had to do a little bit more adjusting than I did.” ― Ursula Burns, Chairman, Xerox 

“Excellence is the best deterrent to racism and sexism.” ― Oprah Winfrey, CEO, Harpo, Inc.

“We must reject not only the stereotypes that others hold of us, but also the stereotypes that we hold of ourselves.”  ― Shirley Chisholm, former congresswoman representing New York’s 12th congressional district

“Definitions belong to the definer, not the defined.”  ― Toni Morrison, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Nobel Prize winner

 

On Femininity:

 

“I have chosen to no longer be apologetic for my femaleness and my femininity. And I want to be respected in all of my femaleness because I deserve to be.”  ― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, novelist, MacArthur Genius Grant recipient

“I trust my intuition implicitly. I don’t talk myself into anything and I don’t cut myself out of anything.” ― Bozoma Saint John, Head of Global Marketing, iTunes & Beats Music

“And frankly, being a woman I think gives me a slightly different take on a lot of the issues and on a lot of the solutions to the problems we face.” ― Carol Moseley Braun, former U.S. Senator (IL)

“I was raised to be an independent woman, not the victim of anything.” ― Kamala Harris, U.S. Senator (CA)

 

On Paving the Way for Other Women:

 

“Being powerful means helping someone else find their voice. Often folks take power to mean personal privilege. I think it means just the opposite. It’s a collective obligation to give back to make sure that the next person has a better opportunity than you have.”  ― Lisa Borders, president, WNBA

“There’s got to be someone who’s willing to do the tough job, there’s got to be someone who’s willing to say, ‘Ok, I’m going to break this ceiling. I’m going to be different, I’m going to be bold, I’m going to take a chance. I’m going to break the barriers so somebody else can come up behind me.’― Nadja Bellan-White, CEO, Ogilvy & Mather Africa at Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide

“Making it through the glass ceiling to the other side was simply a matter of running on a path created by other women’s footprints.” ― Shonda Rhimes, founder & CEO of Shondaland

 

On Trying and Taking Risks:

 

“The biggest risk of all is not taking one.” ― Mellody Hobson, president, Ariel Investments

“Be brave enough to live life creatively. The creative is the place where no one else has ever been. You have to leave the city of your comfort and go into the wilderness of your intuition. You can’t get there by bus, only by hard work and risk and by not quite knowing what you’re doing. What you’ll discover will be wonderful. What you’ll discover will be yourself.” ― Carla Harris, vice chairman, Global Wealth Management & Managing Director & Senior Client Advisor, Morgan Stanley

“Dreams are lovely, but they are just dreams―fleeting, ephemeral, pretty. But dreams do not come true just because you dream them. It’s hard work that makes things happen. It’s hard work that creates change.” ― Shonda Rhimes, founder & CEO of Shondaland

“It’s not about knocking on closed doors. It’s about building our own house and having our own door.”  ― Ava DuVernay, director and screenwriter

 

Can we get a “raised hands” emoji?

 

Powerful Quotes From Black Women Bosses on International Women’s Day

International Women's Day (Bozoma Saint John, Head of Global Marketing for iTunes & Beats Music and one of Black Enterprise’s “Most Powerful Women in Business.” Photo credit: Apple, Inc.)

 

This year’s International Women’s Day is a special one. Not only are women being recognized and celebrated for their strengths, which the holiday has aimed to do since its inception in 1911, but this year it corresponds with the “A Day Without Women” boycott, in which protesters around the nation are uniting for a one-day demonstration to remind people of the valuable contributions women make to the workforce.

Recent research by the Center for American Progress shows that if all paid female workers simultaneously took one day off from work, it would cost the U.S. nearly $21 billion in gross domestic product (GDP). The study, entitled A Day in the U.S. Economy Without Women, also found that women’s labor contributes $7.6 trillion to the U.S. each year.

In the U.S., women make up almost 47% of the workforce, according to United States Department of Labor’s statistics. In 2016, the agency reported that there were about 10.2 million black women in the labor force in 2015, representing one in seven women in the labor force. Of those, 9.3 million were employed, particularly in management and professional occupations.

According to the agency, black women currently earn more than ever and continue to be more likely than other women to participate in the labor force. In 2015, six in 10 black women were employed or actively looking for work—but the wage gap is still stark. The DOL stated that the annual earnings of black women are nearly 20% less than white, non-Hispanic women, and 40% less than white, non-Hispanic men.

There’s no doubt that a black woman sitting in a boardroom, standing on the Senate floor, steering a corporation, or changing the face of what’s shown on television is a vital part of this country’s evolution. Therefore, it’s only fitting that on this day we share some meaningful and empowering quotes from black, female bosses, who continuously show us what it means to make bold moves that initiate substantial change.

Whether you’re protesting today by marching or taking the day off, or you’re demonstrating your solidarity with the A Day Without Women cause by choosing to only shop at small, minority-owned, and minority-women-owned businesses or wearing red, words of wisdom from these unapologetic, female trailblazers will remind you of the enormous value black women bring to the workplace. Today is about having pride in the power of womanhood, and these quotes are sure to inspire and encourage you to speak up, speak out, work harder, and live boldly.

 

On Speaking Up:

 

“I didn’t learn to be quiet when I had an opinion. The reason they knew who I was is because I told them.” ― Ursula Burns, Chairman, Xerox 

“You get in life what you have the courage to ask for.” ― Oprah Winfrey, CEO, Harpo, Inc.

 

On Maintaining Authenticity in the Face of Limitations:

 

“If they don’t give you a seat at the table, bring a folding chair.” ―Shirley Chisholm, former congresswoman representing New York’s 12th Congressional District and the first black woman elected to Congress

“Never compromise who you are personally to become who wish to be professionally. The most expensive real estate you’ll ever own resides between your two ears; be selfish about what you allow to happen on that property.” Janice Bryant Howroyd, CEO, ACT-1 Group

“One of the things I discovered a long time ago was that it’s a waste of energy to spend a lot of time agonizing over how people will receive you. I’m not suggesting that you barrel through life willy-nilly, but I am suggesting that we stop trying to allow other people’s potential prejudices, let alone actual prejudices, to paralyze us.” – Michele Roberts, executive director, National Basketball Players Association

“As you move up—as you engage more and more people in the company and take on broader roles—this idea of ‘looking the part’ becomes more and more of a challenge when you don’t look the part. But there’s nothing I can do, or wanted to do, about being a black female—I kind of like both of those things. So, at the end of the day, the people who were around me had to do a little bit more adjusting than I did.” ― Ursula Burns, Chairman, Xerox 

“Excellence is the best deterrent to racism and sexism.” ― Oprah Winfrey, CEO, Harpo, Inc.

“We must reject not only the stereotypes that others hold of us, but also the stereotypes that we hold of ourselves.”  ― Shirley Chisholm, former congresswoman representing New York’s 12th congressional district

“Definitions belong to the definer, not the defined.”  ― Toni Morrison, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Nobel Prize winner

 

On Femininity:

 

“I have chosen to no longer be apologetic for my femaleness and my femininity. And I want to be respected in all of my femaleness because I deserve to be.”  ― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, novelist, MacArthur Genius Grant recipient

“I trust my intuition implicitly. I don’t talk myself into anything and I don’t cut myself out of anything.” ― Bozoma Saint John, Head of Global Marketing, iTunes & Beats Music

“And frankly, being a woman I think gives me a slightly different take on a lot of the issues and on a lot of the solutions to the problems we face.” ― Carol Moseley Braun, former U.S. Senator (IL)

“I was raised to be an independent woman, not the victim of anything.” ― Kamala Harris, U.S. Senator (CA)

 

On Paving the Way for Other Women:

 

“Being powerful means helping someone else find their voice. Often folks take power to mean personal privilege. I think it means just the opposite. It’s a collective obligation to give back to make sure that the next person has a better opportunity than you have.”  ― Lisa Borders, president, WNBA

“There’s got to be someone who’s willing to do the tough job, there’s got to be someone who’s willing to say, ‘Ok, I’m going to break this ceiling. I’m going to be different, I’m going to be bold, I’m going to take a chance. I’m going to break the barriers so somebody else can come up behind me.’― Nadja Bellan-White, CEO, Ogilvy & Mather Africa at Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide

“Making it through the glass ceiling to the other side was simply a matter of running on a path created by other women’s footprints.” ― Shonda Rhimes, founder & CEO of Shondaland

 

On Trying and Taking Risks:

 

“The biggest risk of all is not taking one.” ― Mellody Hobson, president, Ariel Investments

“Be brave enough to live life creatively. The creative is the place where no one else has ever been. You have to leave the city of your comfort and go into the wilderness of your intuition. You can’t get there by bus, only by hard work and risk and by not quite knowing what you’re doing. What you’ll discover will be wonderful. What you’ll discover will be yourself.” ― Carla Harris, vice chairman, Global Wealth Management & Managing Director & Senior Client Advisor, Morgan Stanley

“Dreams are lovely, but they are just dreams―fleeting, ephemeral, pretty. But dreams do not come true just because you dream them. It’s hard work that makes things happen. It’s hard work that creates change.” ― Shonda Rhimes, founder & CEO of Shondaland

“It’s not about knocking on closed doors. It’s about building our own house and having our own door.”  ― Ava DuVernay, director and screenwriter

 

Can we get a “raised hands” emoji?

 

This is Why Women Are Refusing to Do Any Work Today

work

A Day Without A Woman

 

The world would be a scary place without the work that women contribute. In addition to making up nearly half of the U.S. workforce, women complete an immeasurable amount of unpaid domestic labor as caretakers, while black women make up one of the fastest growing segments of business ownership in the country. Yet, in still, their contributions to society often go unrecognized and underpaid.  On top of that, women are subjected to workplace inequality, sexual harassment, and rollbacks against reproductive rights.

To bring these issues to light, women across the country are refusing to do any work today. Instead, they are participating in A Day Without A Woman, a national campaign aimed to highlight the crucial role women play in the U.S. economy and abroad. It is also a strike to fight back against gender-based inequality, violence, and discrimination.

Organized by the women behind the history-making Women’s March in January, A Day Without A Woman encourages women to stay home from their jobs and take rest from their routine domestic duties, like household chores and caregiving. Those who couldn’t get the day off from work are encouraged to wear red in solidarity and avoid shopping at all companies outside of small, women and minority-owned businesses.

A Day Without A Woman was intentionally planned to be held on March 8 to coincide with International Women’s Day. This is also the day when millions of women’s rights advocates in more than 30 countries around the world are partaking in the International Women’s Strike.

How Can Allies Show Support?

 

Business owners can support this cause by giving their female employees the day off from work. Meanwhile, husbands and boyfriends can show support by doing chores on behalf of their wives and partners.

 

The Cost of A Day Without A Woman

 

Research published by the Center for American Progress shows that the U.S. would not be able to function if all paid female workers simultaneously take one day off from work. If that happened, it would cost the country nearly $21 billion in gross domestic product (GDP.) The study, which is titled A Day in the U.S. Economy Without Women, also found that women’s labor contributes $7.6 trillion to the U.S. each year.

But women’s work expands beyond paid labor. If the GDP were to include all of the unpaid domestic work primarily performed by women, then that number would increase by 26 percent.

“Women have long played a vital role in the economy, but women’s earnings and economic contributions are becoming more and more essential,” said Kate Bahn, an Economist at CAP and co-author of the analysis, in a press release sent to Black Enterprise. “However, due to occupational segregation and the devaluation of jobs that women disproportionately hold, outdated labor standards, and insufficient work-family policies, women in the United States aren’t able to meet their full economic potential.”

In addition to calling for respect for their labor, activists are also using A Day Without A Woman to push lawmakers to pass policies that support women and mothers like paid family and medical leave, paid sick leave, and access to quality, affordable child care.

 

This is Why Women Are Refusing to Do Any Work Today

work

A Day Without A Woman

 

The world would be a scary place without the work that women contribute. In addition to making up nearly half of the U.S. workforce, women complete an immeasurable amount of unpaid domestic labor as caretakers, while black women make up one of the fastest growing segments of business ownership in the country. Yet, in still, their contributions to society often go unrecognized and underpaid.  On top of that, women are subjected to workplace inequality, sexual harassment, and rollbacks against reproductive rights.

To bring these issues to light, women across the country are refusing to do any work today. Instead, they are participating in A Day Without A Woman, a national campaign aimed to highlight the crucial role women play in the U.S. economy and abroad. It is also a strike to fight back against gender-based inequality, violence, and discrimination.

Organized by the women behind the history-making Women’s March in January, A Day Without A Woman encourages women to stay home from their jobs and take rest from their routine domestic duties, like household chores and caregiving. Those who couldn’t get the day off from work are encouraged to wear red in solidarity and avoid shopping at all companies outside of small, women and minority-owned businesses.

A Day Without A Woman was intentionally planned to be held on March 8 to coincide with International Women’s Day. This is also the day when millions of women’s rights advocates in more than 30 countries around the world are partaking in the International Women’s Strike.

How Can Allies Show Support?

 

Business owners can support this cause by giving their female employees the day off from work. Meanwhile, husbands and boyfriends can show support by doing chores on behalf of their wives and partners.

 

The Cost of A Day Without A Woman

 

Research published by the Center for American Progress shows that the U.S. would not be able to function if all paid female workers simultaneously take one day off from work. If that happened, it would cost the country nearly $21 billion in gross domestic product (GDP.) The study, which is titled A Day in the U.S. Economy Without Women, also found that women’s labor contributes $7.6 trillion to the U.S. each year.

But women’s work expands beyond paid labor. If the GDP were to include all of the unpaid domestic work primarily performed by women, then that number would increase by 26 percent.

“Women have long played a vital role in the economy, but women’s earnings and economic contributions are becoming more and more essential,” said Kate Bahn, an Economist at CAP and co-author of the analysis, in a press release sent to Black Enterprise. “However, due to occupational segregation and the devaluation of jobs that women disproportionately hold, outdated labor standards, and insufficient work-family policies, women in the United States aren’t able to meet their full economic potential.”

In addition to calling for respect for their labor, activists are also using A Day Without A Woman to push lawmakers to pass policies that support women and mothers like paid family and medical leave, paid sick leave, and access to quality, affordable child care.

 

Great Tips for Female Creative Directors

Despite women holding 80% of consumer power, it’s been reported that only three percent of creative directors are female. But, even with low stats, its important that when women are given the opportunity to sit in the creative director seat, they are prepared to put their best foot forward. Adweek contributor and professor of advertising at Boston University, Edward Boches, reports on 18 things great creative directors do that set them apart from not-so-great directors.

[Related: Gabrielle Jordan Sets the Bar High In Business]

1. “Set the creative standards and objectives so that everyone understands them.”

Boches says people need to know what’s expected of them. The higher the expectation, the better. Be clear with expectations and examples, especially if you are trying to effect change and improve work on a longterm basis.

2. “Be approachable and accessible, and eliminate any anxiety.”

Broches reminds you that if you’re the new creative director and there are creative people already working in your department, they’ll be nervous and anxious to know what this means for them personally. They’ll also be eager to know more about you personally and professionally.

3. “Find out what your staff thinks about the work and solicit their suggestions for how to make it better.”

Engage with your team. You want to know how they feel about their output and they want to know you’re willing to hear their suggestions. They’ll appreciate that you’re listening.

4. “Create a culture of honest engagement.”

Eliminate that daunting hierarchy. Allow anyone at any level to speak their mind, throw in an idea, or express their opinion about the work. It’s ultimately your decision, but you want the culture to be an honest one.

5. “Be specific and constructive when you review work.”

Broches’ says “that’s just not doing it for me,” is a meaningless form of feedback. Be specific about what needs work on a project. Is there a kernel of a good idea in there? If so, find it. If not, suggest angles and directions so the team knows where to go. No one likes a leader that plays the guessing game.

To read the rest of Edward Boches’ tips for being a great creative director, head over to Adweek

Hyundai Honors Influential Women in Atlanta Who Inspire Their Community

The Hyundai campaign celebrates the lives and accomplishments of everyday women, who are living life on their own terms and achieving success by making smart choices.  This new campaign is part of Hyundai’s ongoing commitment to diversity inclusion. Hyundai celebrated this campaign at the #SmarterLiving event held in Atlanta, Georgia on Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at a private location.

The event introduced the newly-designed 2015 Sonata to the all-important women’s market and featured a distinct panel of femme-fatale influencers featured in the campaign including Shantis Das (Founder of Press Reset/ Hip Hop Professional), Myleik Teele (Founder of Curlbox),  Rashan Ali (Media Personality), Christine White (Lawyer and Tech Investor), and Marshawn Evans (Motivational Speaker) . The evening, hosted by James Andrews (Founder of True Story), featured a special charity contribution to Spelman University by Zafar Brooks (Director of Corporate Social Responsibility and Diversity Inclusion at Hyundai Motor America) and Clifford Franklin (Fuse Advertising) and concluded with a heartfelt performance by award winning songstress Kelly Price.

Dave Zuchowski, President and CEO, Hyundai Motor America, debuted the campaign at the Global Automotive Summit in Detroit on October 13th.  ”Hyundai is committed to diversity and inclusion as a key business imperative,” said Zuchowski.  ”We understand that the marketplace is changing, and Hyundai has a history of connecting with its owner base on issues important to them.  Women represent the majority of automotive purchase decisions in U.S. households.  These women are making the best choices for their finances, families, wellness and careers.  Hyundai is proud to be a brand that represents a smart choice in meeting their transportation needs.”

The Hyundai Smarter campaign was created by the FUSE advertising agency, a St. Louis, MO based firm led by Cliff Franklin.  The twenty-year-old firm has extensive experience with building brands and multicultural market communications.  The campaign will be launched via digital media, and will include local TV, radio, and outdoor advertising in Atlanta, Charlotte and Dallas.  A custom website and unique brand-book which compliment the campaign feature the stories of amazing every day women who are successful through their own Smarter decisions.  A digital version of the brand-book can be downloaded on the website, HyundaiSmarter.com.

“We applaud Hyundai for creating this innovative campaign targeting women,” says Shelia Eldridge, President and CEO of Miles Ahead Entertainment and producer of the Mocha Mavens.  ”The increasing purchasing power of women and their influence on household purchases have never been more important.  Hyundai has shown it understands the needs of this market.  Hyundai is a brand that has enjoyed appeal to the black community because of its reputation for product quality and design.  This new advertising campaign will not only speak directly to the issues of importance to black women, but all women in general.  The twenty-two women bloggers in our group are excited to connect Hyundai’s story to the more than 1 million women who follow our daily conversations.  We are honored to be a part of the Hyundai Smarter effort,” concludes Ms. Eldridge.

The campaign culminates with a grand prize trip to the 46th Annual NAACP Image Awards show.

ABOUT HYUNDAI MOTOR AMERICA

Hyundai Motor America, headquartered in Fountain Valley, Calif., is a subsidiary of Hyundai Motor Co. of Korea.  Hyundai vehicles are distributed throughout the United States by Hyundai Motor America and are sold and serviced through more than 820 dealerships nationwide.  All Hyundai vehicles sold in the U.S. are covered by the Hyundai Assurance program, which includes the 5-year/60,000-mile fully transferable new vehicle limited warranty, Hyundai’s 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain limited warranty, and five years of complimentary Roadside Assistance.  Hyundai Assurance includes Assurance Connected Care that provides owners of Hyundai models equipped with the Hyundai Blue Link telematics system with proactive safety and car care services complimentary for three years.  These services include Automatic Collision Notification, Enhanced Roadside Assistance, Vehicle Diagnostic Alert, Monthly Vehicle Health Report and in-vehicle service scheduling.

For more details on Hyundai Assurance, please visit www.HyundaiAssurance.com, our media website at www.HyundaiNews.com and our blog at www.HyundaiLikeSunday.com.

Continue the conversation at:

@HyundaiSmarter | #SmarterLiving