Billionaire Investor Chris Sacca Champions Diversity at SXSW

Chris Sacca

Christine Souffrant Ntim is known for her tenacity and innate ability to hustle, so it’s no wonder she became the topic of conversation after the Chris Sacca one-on-one conversation with Alex Konrad of Forbes at SXSW.

Sacca has been very vocal about being in high support of diversity in tech. During his SXSW conversation, he mentions Tala.co as one of his companies that people should focus on saying, “more than half the company is women.” In addition, it has, “a shockingly large number of engineers of color, product people of color, they operate in Africa. We have actual African computer science engineers. It’s an absolute victory,” says Sacca.

He goes on to say, “I think there’s two reasons to pursue diversity and inclusion in our business. One is because you should really believe that there’s been hundreds of years of discrimination in our country. You should really believe, and it’s not disputable, that women earn .73 on the dollar compared to men and we should all do our part to fix that sh*t.”

“Let’s say you’re a cold-hearted Scrooge McDuck a$$hole and you don’t take those things at face value. Either way, it just turns out, the data is clear that companies with women in the boardroom, women at the helm, women through all parts of the stack, diverse populations of employees with underrepresented people representing the company, they do better. They outperform,” states Sacca.

So what happened during the Q&A section of this talk? Ntim was on her way to ask a question and two white male individuals tried to dart in front of her. According to Ntim, Sacca immediately called them out saying that he wanted the first question to either be from a woman or someone of a diverse background, putting her first at the mic. 

She went on to ask, “You get a lot of pitches so you see a lot of innovation from all over the world. Where do you think the next big thing is going to come from? Is it going to come from Silicon Valley or an emerging market like Haiti, and if so, would you be interested in coming to speak at the Haiti Tech Summit?”

Christine Souffrant Ntim (Image: Christine Souffrant Ntim/Chris Sacca)

 

Everyone was so impressed with the way that Ntim articulated her question after her close encounter with being shut out that, for the rest of the night, she was referred to as the girl with the question, referencing Sacca’s talk.

What I found interesting about the entire scenario was that when two white males were clearly out of line, literally, after Sacca put them in their place, it took someone who looked like them to speak up. That’s the importance of having allies. I personally think there’s a bigger message here that is very much needed to create the diversity and equality we all deserve.

With that being said, the question still remains; as a proponent of diversity, will Sacca continue this conversation at the Haiti Tech Summit?

 

 

 


Sequoia BlodgettSequoia Blodgett is the Technology Editor for Black Enterprise, Silicon Valley. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform, focused on personal development, guided by informed, pop culture.

When White Women Speak about Unfairness in Tech, Everybody Listens

white women

Two things never cease to amaze me. One is the depth of white male privilege being such that it allows white men to get away with outrageous and inappropriate behavior that absolutely no one else could.

The second is how all  it takes is a blog post from a white woman complaining about sexual harassment in Silicon Valley, and boom—it goes viral, becoming the single, most talked about tech news of the week (sometimes for months)—and revs up the diversity in tech talk to 4000 RPMs.

Case in point, the now-viral blog post of former Uber engineer Susan J. Fowler. Fowler’s blog post revealed some truly stomach-turning behavior at Uber—which, by now, shouldn’t surprise anyone regularly following Uber news. From Fowler’s post:

On my first official day rotating on the team, my new manager sent me a string of messages over company chat. He was in an open relationship, he said, and his girlfriend was having an easy time finding new partners but he wasn’t. He was trying to stay out of trouble at work, he said, but he couldn’t help getting in trouble, because he was looking for women to have sex with.

Ick. To date, Fowler’s blog post has been liked over 10,000 times in less than a week from release and has prompted a lot of analysis and opinion pieces (like this one) from various media outlets, including leading publications such as Fortune. There was such a burning spotlight shed on her complaints that Uber CEO Travis Kalanick was forced to address Fowler’s blog and denounce the incidents she described as “abhorrent and against everything we believe in.”

I am glad Fowler was brave enough to put this out in the open. It’s heartening to see such voluminous response. What is frustrating is that it takes a white woman opening her mouth for everyone to acknowledge just how jacked up diversity in tech is.

It seems as though when we, women of color, open our mouths to complain about unfair treatment we are told, as I was at a prominent tech publication that I used to work at, that we have “attitude problems.”

Or, how about the case of Melvin Smith, ever heard of him? Probably not. Smith is a black engineer who claims he was hired at a lower salary than an equally skilled white worker and then was the first to be fired during a staff reduction because he had complained. Smith sued, had his case dismissed at first, and then reinstated upon appeal. And you hear nothing about this case from the usual diversity in tech champions.

If Smith had been a young white woman, he would have been asked to do a TED talk by now!

Even Asian women who complain about unequal treatment in the tech industry are subject to different, and often less supportive, responses than their white counterparts. Former Twitter engineer Tina Huang says she was denied promotions and eventually forced out for airing her grievances. Twitter’s CEO and executives did not come out and condemn any unfair treatment she may have experienced, they continue to deny her allegations, saying her claims are “baseless.”

Ellen Pao, another Asian American woman, sued Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, for $16 million for gender-based discrimination. Not only did she lose that suit, her co-workers during the trial referred to her as “entitled” and “too opinionated.”

Contrast that with Kelly Ellis going public about being harassed when she worked at Google. She tweeted that a male Google engineer said to her, “It’s taking all of my self-control not to grab your ass right now.” Google did not try to demean her or deny the allegations, the company just remained silent. Ellis quickly gained thousands of followers on Twitter and became a symbol of the fight for diversity in Silicon Valley.

And I’m glad. I’m encouraged whenever any woman finds her voice to speak out against injustice. But I wish white women would use the privilege they have to evoke outrage and garner support for others shut out and abused by Silicon Valley culture.

That’s not to say white woman don’t receive backlash for speaking up. Oh, the internet trolls are always at the ready with their hateful little comments and very frightening threats of sexual violence. Yet, very often the companies that a white woman makes accusations against will make a public response promising to investigate the woman’s complaint. Then, the woman is held up as a champion of diversity in tech. They are taken more seriously.

Chances are if you walk into your new, exciting job in Silicon Valley as one of just a handful of white female employees, and you see few-to-no brown people, you may be working in an environment that will eventually turn toxic on you. To white women in tech, I implore: Get as outraged about your company’s lack of diversity as when you’re the one put in an uncomfortable position.

 

 

 


Samara Lynn is a tech editor at Black Enterprise magazine. She has over a decade’s experience in technology journalism, covering smart home and wireless technology; startups; business tech and more. She has also written for PC Magazine, The Wirecutter, CRN Tech and has appeared as a technology commentator on Fox Business News, National Business Report, and Reuters TV. She is the author of “Windows Server 2012: Up and Running.” “Tech 100” is her column focusing on technology and its relation to politics, social issues, and more.

 

 

 

 

 

When White Women Speak about Unfairness in Tech, Everybody Listens

white women

Two things never cease to amaze me. One is the depth of white male privilege being such that it allows white men to get away with outrageous and inappropriate behavior that absolutely no one else could.

The second is how all  it takes is a blog post from a white woman complaining about sexual harassment in Silicon Valley, and boom—it goes viral, becoming the single, most talked about tech news of the week (sometimes for months)—and revs up the diversity in tech talk to 4000 RPMs.

Case in point, the now-viral blog post of former Uber engineer Susan J. Fowler. Fowler’s blog post revealed some truly stomach-turning behavior at Uber—which, by now, shouldn’t surprise anyone regularly following Uber news. From Fowler’s post:

On my first official day rotating on the team, my new manager sent me a string of messages over company chat. He was in an open relationship, he said, and his girlfriend was having an easy time finding new partners but he wasn’t. He was trying to stay out of trouble at work, he said, but he couldn’t help getting in trouble, because he was looking for women to have sex with.

Ick. To date, Fowler’s blog post has been liked over 10,000 times in less than a week from release and has prompted a lot of analysis and opinion pieces (like this one) from various media outlets, including leading publications such as Fortune. There was such a burning spotlight shed on her complaints that Uber CEO Travis Kalanick was forced to address Fowler’s blog and denounce the incidents she described as “abhorrent and against everything we believe in.”

I am glad Fowler was brave enough to put this out in the open. It’s heartening to see such voluminous response. What is frustrating is that it takes a white woman opening her mouth for everyone to acknowledge just how jacked up diversity in tech is.

It seems as though when we, women of color, open our mouths to complain about unfair treatment we are told, as I was at a prominent tech publication that I used to work at, that we have “attitude problems.”

Or, how about the case of Melvin Smith, ever heard of him? Probably not. Smith is a black engineer who claims he was hired at a lower salary than an equally skilled white worker and then was the first to be fired during a staff reduction because he had complained. Smith sued, had his case dismissed at first, and then reinstated upon appeal. And you hear nothing about this case from the usual diversity in tech champions.

If Smith had been a young white woman, he would have been asked to do a TED talk by now!

Even Asian women who complain about unequal treatment in the tech industry are subject to different, and often less supportive, responses than their white counterparts. Former Twitter engineer Tina Huang says she was denied promotions and eventually forced out for airing her grievances. Twitter’s CEO and executives did not come out and condemn any unfair treatment she may have experienced, they continue to deny her allegations, saying her claims are “baseless.”

Ellen Pao, another Asian American woman, sued Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, for $16 million for gender-based discrimination. Not only did she lose that suit, her co-workers during the trial referred to her as “entitled” and “too opinionated.”

Contrast that with Kelly Ellis going public about being harassed when she worked at Google. She tweeted that a male Google engineer said to her, “It’s taking all of my self-control not to grab your ass right now.” Google did not try to demean her or deny the allegations, the company just remained silent. Ellis quickly gained thousands of followers on Twitter and became a symbol of the fight for diversity in Silicon Valley.

And I’m glad. I’m encouraged whenever any woman finds her voice to speak out against injustice. But I wish white women would use the privilege they have to evoke outrage and garner support for others shut out and abused by Silicon Valley culture.

That’s not to say white woman don’t receive backlash for speaking up. Oh, the internet trolls are always at the ready with their hateful little comments and very frightening threats of sexual violence. Yet, very often the companies that a white woman makes accusations against will make a public response promising to investigate the woman’s complaint. Then, the woman is held up as a champion of diversity in tech. They are taken more seriously.

Chances are if you walk into your new, exciting job in Silicon Valley as one of just a handful of white female employees, and you see few-to-no brown people, you may be working in an environment that will eventually turn toxic on you. To white women in tech, I implore: Get as outraged about your company’s lack of diversity as when you’re the one put in an uncomfortable position.

 

 

 


Samara Lynn is a tech editor at Black Enterprise magazine. She has over a decade’s experience in technology journalism, covering smart home and wireless technology; startups; business tech and more. She has also written for PC Magazine, The Wirecutter, CRN Tech and has appeared as a technology commentator on Fox Business News, National Business Report, and Reuters TV. She is the author of “Windows Server 2012: Up and Running.” “Tech 100” is her column focusing on technology and its relation to politics, social issues, and more.

 

 

 

 

 

This May Be the Most Diverse E-Commerce Company Ever

E-commerce

E-commerce is a vast market. It’s driven primarily by three types of online transactions: digital banking; buying and selling digital goods; and buying and selling physical goods.

The market is predicted to grow from $4.9 trillion in 2015, to just over $8 trillion by 2020. Adding to those figured are massive online events, like Cyber Monday, which generated $40 billion in online sales in the U.S. this holiday season.

Clearly, it’s good to be in the e-commerce business. However, as with other tech sectors, the e-commerce business is largely profiting white men; they are the ones at the head of most successful e-commerce ventures.

This is why FSAstore.com, a New York City-based e-commerce site, is currently creating buzz. The site is unique in that it lets users shop for FSA healthcare products online. FSA (Flexible Spending Accounts) are employer-based programs that allow consumers to set aside tax-free dollars to purchase medical products and services.

Customers can show for over four thousand products without having to guess which ones can or can’t be used with FSA dollars because on the site, all products fall under FSA eligibility. Products are wide in range and include simple items such as bandages and baby thermometers to more urgent care needs including blood glucose monitors and smart pill reminder devices.

In addition to being a unique e-commerce site, Founder Jeremy Miller has also made building a diverse team a high priority. Just under half of all employees are women; 21% are Asian; 13% are Hispanic; and 11% are African American.

On building a diverse company, Miller says, “You begin with diversity. Here, in New York, we have a large and very diverse pool to choose from.”

He then outlines a series of steps to increase diversity and keep it on track:

  1. Grow organically.
  2. Find people to fit the need.
  3. Assign people to work across teams.
  4. Promote from within.
  5. Build on that diversity with referrals.

FSAStore.com was named 156th on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500, which is a list of fastest growing high-tech companies proving diversity works.

 

 

 

This May Be the Most Diverse E-Commerce Company Ever

E-commerce

E-commerce is a vast market. It’s driven primarily by three types of online transactions: digital banking; buying and selling digital goods; and buying and selling physical goods.

The market is predicted to grow from $4.9 trillion in 2015, to just over $8 trillion by 2020. Adding to those figured are massive online events, like Cyber Monday, which generated $40 billion in online sales in the U.S. this holiday season.

Clearly, it’s good to be in the e-commerce business. However, as with other tech sectors, the e-commerce business is largely profiting white men; they are the ones at the head of most successful e-commerce ventures.

This is why FSAstore.com, a New York City-based e-commerce site, is currently creating buzz. The site is unique in that it lets users shop for FSA healthcare products online. FSA (Flexible Spending Accounts) are employer-based programs that allow consumers to set aside tax-free dollars to purchase medical products and services.

Customers can show for over four thousand products without having to guess which ones can or can’t be used with FSA dollars because on the site, all products fall under FSA eligibility. Products are wide in range and include simple items such as bandages and baby thermometers to more urgent care needs including blood glucose monitors and smart pill reminder devices.

In addition to being a unique e-commerce site, Founder Jeremy Miller has also made building a diverse team a high priority. Just under half of all employees are women; 21% are Asian; 13% are Hispanic; and 11% are African American.

On building a diverse company, Miller says, “You begin with diversity. Here, in New York, we have a large and very diverse pool to choose from.”

He then outlines a series of steps to increase diversity and keep it on track:

  1. Grow organically.
  2. Find people to fit the need.
  3. Assign people to work across teams.
  4. Promote from within.
  5. Build on that diversity with referrals.

FSAStore.com was named 156th on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500, which is a list of fastest growing high-tech companies proving diversity works.

 

 

 

College Fires Diverse, American IT Staff, Replaces with H-1B Holders

H-1B

Last week, The University of California fired IT workers, including a number of African Americans, in order to replace them with IT workers from India, charges members of the University Professional and Technical Employees-Communication Workers of America Local 9119 union.

The UC college system recently partnered with HCL, a global contractor headquartered in India, which places workers in IT positions. UC signed a five-year contract to cut costs by outsourcing IT services and management.

UC San Francisco employees and members of the CWA union are condemning the replacement of American technology workers with lower-paid workers from India. They also strongly criticize both UC and HCL for shipping in H1-B holders, citing the purpose of the H1-B program is to fill highly-skilled talent gaps and not to displace U.S. workers.

“It is clear from the broad opposition within the UC community, Congress, and the public that offshoring good California jobs is counter-intuitive to the mission of the university, and betrays taxpayer trust,” said Keith Pavlik, a UCSF employee and member of UPTE-CWA Local 9119, who spoke out at the board’s January meeting.

“At the same time, this puts patients, research, and other private data at risk, outside the scope of HIPAA and other U.S. privacy laws. As stakeholders in the university, we ask that UC President Janet Napolitano and the Regents reverse the decision to offshore UCSF IT jobs, and preserve the jobs of the dedicated professional UC IT staff.”

There are critics who charge that Silicon Valley takes advantage of the H-1B visa program to hire cheap labor. There is also the concern that doing so, can impact job placement of people of color in the tech industry—which already lacks diversity.

The UC employees protesting also point out that UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep Khosla and UC Berkeley Dean of Engineering S. Shankar Sastry sit on the board of HCL.

Black Enterprise requested a statement from UCSF, one of the 10 campuses in the UC system. Here is UCSF’s statement on the issue:

In July of 2016, UCSF notified 49 career employees and 30 employees, who had been working on temporary contracts with the university, that they would be laid off at the end of February, as a result of a reorganization aimed at addressing a significant escalation in cost for IT services. These employees carried out certain back-end IT services that would no longer be performed at UCSF, but would instead by undertaken by a contractor, HCL America. Since then, a number of these workers have found new IT jobs, both at UCSF and in the private sector.

This reorganization is an unfortunate but necessary step to rein in IT costs, which have risen steeply. The pressure is driven in part by the increased demand for IT services, including the electronic medical record and the use of big data for research aimed at improving diagnostics and care for patients.

UCSF has three missions. It provides medical care, including to many poor and vulnerable people through MediCal and Medicare, as well as charity care. It does world-class research. And it educates graduate health professionals. Given dwindling state support for education and stagnant federal funds for research, UCSF’s health system, known as UCSF Health, is shouldering more of the costs of UCSF’s research and education, and the number of underinsured and uninsured patients is rising, making it more important than ever that UCSF Health be financially stable. To ensure that patients now and in the future receive care, it is critical that we look at new ways of doing business, including partnering with others when it makes sense. UCSF Health is entirely self-sufficient and receives no financial support from the state.

UCSF has been open and transparent with workers throughout this two-year review process, which concluded that it was more economical and secure to partner with specialized vendors on those aspects of information technology that do not require close interaction with research, patient care or education. The vast majority of UCSF’s IT services will remain in-house.

Additionally, the college’s representatives said that their “efforts to find these workers jobs continues.” Of the 40 staff impacted, eight have taken internal UC positions; six are targeted and interviewing for UCSF IT positions; five have taken external positions; and at least two are considering other external offers.

 

 

 

 

Slack’s Former VP of Engineering, Leslie Miley, is a Man of His Word

Leslie Miley

In November of 2016, Black Enterprise spoke with Leslie Miley, who was then the VP of Engineering at Slack, about what he felt were the necessary steps to increase diversity in the tech ecosystem.

“We can diversify workforces by allocating money and building campuses in more diverse cities, including Atlanta, Detroit, and Richmond, Virginia,” said a frustrated Miley. Well, he wasted no time venturing into his new endeavor.

Recently Miley joined the team at Venture for America to help empower recent grads to launch their careers as entrepreneurs and revitalize American cities. He is an integral part of their program, spearheading their new initiative as the first Executive in Residence (EIR).

The aim of the program is to bring top executives from key tech companies including Slack, LinkedIn, and others, to VFA cities for a year-long residency to serve as resources to the innovation and entrepreneurship communities. Miley will be taking a yearlong fellowship with Venture for America, sponsored by Slack, to launch and lead the new EIR program based in San Francisco.

 

Leslie Miley (Image: Leslie Miley)

 

With offices in Detroit, Cincinnati, Providence, New Orleans, Baltimore, Cleveland, Philadelphia, Columbus, San Antonio, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Charlotte, Nashville, Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Kansas City, St. Louis, and Birmingham, Miley’s leadership will be the basis of how these other programs are shaped.

“Encouraging tech investment in communities with lower costs of living and the same entrepreneurial spirit seen in Silicon Valley, should not be constrained to Seattle, Austin, or Boston but should also include cities like Denver, Detroit, New Orleans, and St. Louis,” says Miley. “Our goal is to encourage tech investment in people as well as capital, in communities with lower costs of living with the same entrepreneurial spirit seen in Silicon Valley.”

 

 

 


Sequoia BlodgettSequoia Blodgett is the Silicon Valley, tech editor for Black Enterprise. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform, focused on personal development, guided by informed pop culture.

 

Slack’s Former VP of Engineering, Leslie Miley, is a Man of His Word

Leslie Miley

In November of 2016, Black Enterprise spoke with Leslie Miley, who was then the VP of Engineering at Slack, about what he felt were the necessary steps to increase diversity in the tech ecosystem.

“We can diversify workforces by allocating money and building campuses in more diverse cities, including Atlanta, Detroit, and Richmond, Virginia,” said a frustrated Miley. Well, he wasted no time venturing into his new endeavor.

Recently Miley joined the team at Venture for America to help empower recent grads to launch their careers as entrepreneurs and revitalize American cities. He is an integral part of their program, spearheading their new initiative as the first Executive in Residence (EIR).

The aim of the program is to bring top executives from key tech companies including Slack, LinkedIn, and others, to VFA cities for a year-long residency to serve as resources to the innovation and entrepreneurship communities. Miley will be taking a yearlong fellowship with Venture for America, sponsored by Slack, to launch and lead the new EIR program based in San Francisco.

 

Leslie Miley (Image: Leslie Miley)

 

With offices in Detroit, Cincinnati, Providence, New Orleans, Baltimore, Cleveland, Philadelphia, Columbus, San Antonio, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Charlotte, Nashville, Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Kansas City, St. Louis, and Birmingham, Miley’s leadership will be the basis of how these other programs are shaped.

“Encouraging tech investment in communities with lower costs of living and the same entrepreneurial spirit seen in Silicon Valley, should not be constrained to Seattle, Austin, or Boston but should also include cities like Denver, Detroit, New Orleans, and St. Louis,” says Miley. “Our goal is to encourage tech investment in people as well as capital, in communities with lower costs of living with the same entrepreneurial spirit seen in Silicon Valley.”

 

 

 


Sequoia BlodgettSequoia Blodgett is the Silicon Valley, tech editor for Black Enterprise. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform, focused on personal development, guided by informed pop culture.

 

Google Tag Teams With the National Society of Black Engineers in Diversity Effort

NSBE

The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and Google have joined forces to launch Code Success @ NSBE. The program is year-round and offers college students, who are also members of NSBE, coding boot camps led by expert instructors in the field, with emphasis on JavaScript, JAVA, Python, and Ruby coding languages; CS workshops at NSBE’s 2017 Annual Convention; and award competitions that encourage students to utilize the skills they have learned to develop innovative technology.

“This program shows what can happen when private industry and the nonprofit sector work together toward mutual goals,” says NSBE National Chair Matthew Nelson. “If you look at the statistics for bachelor’s degree recipients in computer science over the past six years in this country, you’ll see that the number of graduates has increased steadily. But, the percentage of African Americans among those graduates has decreased. Code Success @ NSBE will help us move the needle back toward parity for African Americans in this field.”

“As a member of the Board of Corporate Affiliates, NSBE’s top-level supporters, Google has demonstrated its full commitment to increasing diversity in the high-tech sector,” says NSBE Executive Director Karl W. Reid, Ed.D. “The Code Success @ NSBE program is another example of Google’s willingness to lend its talent, creativity, and its financial resources to the strategic efforts that ensure that every population is tapped to fill the burgeoning demand for tech talent.”

The program also provides one-on-one mentoring from members of the Institute for African American Mentoring in Computing Sciences (iAAMCS). Career services support will be available through a bi-monthly webinar series that explores topics such as academic preparation, technical resume development, interview preparation, internship opportunities, and more.

Additionally, 18 Code Success Scholarships will be awarded. Recipients will receive monthly review sessions and training focused on front-end, back-end, and full-stack web development languages, in addition to other benefits from the program.

 

 

Airbnb Releases Anti-Discrimination Battle Plan

airbnb new logo

Amid increasing outrage over discriminatory practices by some Airbnb hosts’ refusal to accept guest requests from black people, Airbnb released specifics on its strategy to fight racism on its platform.

Starting Nov. 1, Airbnb users must check off on the Airbnb Community Commitment. This is an agreement to “treat all fellow members of this community, regardless of race, religion, national origin, disability, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation or age, with respect, and without judgment or bias.”

Policy Details

Open Doors is another new policy providing alternative hosts or accommodations for any Airbnb guest who feels they have been subject to discrimination.

These guests will also receive booking assistance with their next reservation. This policy goes into effect Oct. 1. It will apply retroactively to anyone who complained about discriminatory treatment as of Sept. 8.

Less reliance on photos for booking is another area Airbnb is exploring to fight racism on its platform. CEO Brian Chesky said in a blog post that the Instant Booking feature, which lets hosts make bookings immediately, would be expanded.

The new anti-discrimination guidelines stem from Airbnb’s work with experts in the area of legal matters and racism.

Mighty Help

In July, the company announced that it had enlisted the help of former Attorney General Eric Holder, to craft a new anti-discrimination policy. The company also turned to Laura Murphy, the former chief of the ACLU’s Washington office, Dr. Robert Livingston of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and Dr. Peter Glick of Lawrence University.

“Airbnb has conducted a rigorous, thorough, and inclusive review of its technology and its policies. The review included conversations with employees at every level of the company, Airbnb hosts and victims of discrimination, and outside experts. It also included outreach to civil rights organizations, regulators, and federal and state lawmakers,” wrote Holder in a Huffington Post op-ed.