From Intern to Mogul: 5 Celebrities Who Were Once Interns

intern (Image: Creative Commons/Wikimedia)

 

Chance the Rapper has accomplished a lot in his young and busy life. At just 23-years-old, the independent artist earned $500,000 with his Apple Music dealwas named on Fortune’s “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders” list; and was the first independent artist to be nominated for a Grammys where he took home three of the coveted awards, in total. So what’s Chance’s next move? Getting an intern.

On Monday, the hip-hop star tweeted:

 

 

Like most internships, this will probably provide a recent college grad with firsthand work experience, along with the opportunity to hone their skills while learning new ones. Of course, interning for Chance will also probably come with amazing perks, such as going on a world tour, or meeting some of the superstars he is affiliated with, like Kanye West or Barack Obama.

Although most people will never experience an internship of this magnitude, this doesn’t mean that an ordinary internship can’t transform into an extraordinary opportunity. Many business moguls, in fact, actually started off as interns before launching extremely successful careers. Here’s a list of five celebrities who, just like you and me, were once interns.

Here’s a list of five celebrities who, just like you and I, were once interns:

 

1. Sean Combs

 

Before building a music empire, Sean “P. Diddy” Combs started off as an intern at New York’s Uptown Records, after he reportedly begged Heavy D. to connect him with some at the label. After Uptown Records Founder Andrew Harrell gave him a shot as an unpaid intern, Combs worked his way up, eventually becoming an A&R executive. Eventually, tensions developed between Harrell and Combs, and he was fired from the label. However, two weeks later, Combs established Bad Boy Records—and the rest is history.

 

2. Oprah Winfrey

 

Today, Oprah Winfrey reigns as the “Queen of all Media,” boasting a net worth of $3 billion, according to Forbes. However, during the early days of her career in television, she was an intern for the CBS affiliate channel, WLAC-TV, in Nashville. Following the internship, she was offered a full-time position as an anchor-reporter, which made her the first black female news anchor at the station.

 

3. Spike Lee

 

After obtaining a B.A. in mass communications at Morehouse College, the award-winning director went on to intern at Columbia Pictures.

 

4. Kanye West

 

Although Kanye West was already a multiplatinum hip-hop artist by 2009, he launched his fashion career by starting as an intern for Fendi. Rather than being treated as a superstar, West told Hot 97 that his duties included coffee errands and making photocopies at the Italian fashion house, reports The Guardian. Today, West owns his own successful fashion line called Yeezy.

 

5. Steve Jobs

 

Steve Jobs was just 12-years-old when he landed his first internship working on an assembly line at Hewlett-Packard. In addition to learning how to put screws into computer parts, the summer internship gave Jobs the opportunity to connect with Steve Wozniak. Jobs and Wozniak later went on to become business partners, launching Apple in 1976,  which has since evolved into one of the most iconic brands in history.

 

 


Selena HillSelena Hill is the Associate Digital Editor at Black Enterprise and the founder of Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio. You can hear Hill and her team talk millennial politics and social issues every Sunday at 11 a.m. ET.

Follow her on Instagram and Twitter at @MsSelenaHill.

How 3 Friends Brought Together 500 Silicon Valley Interns

Silicon Valley

This article originally appeared on The Well, Jopwell’s editorial hub. 

It began in May, when North Carolina A&T State University computer science students Paul Hammond and Lusenii Kromah connected about their upcoming internships at Silicon Valley technology companies.

Lusenii, a class of 2016 graduate, was headed to Adobe as a web development intern. Paul, also a web developer and graduating senior, had landed an internship at Apple. As newly minted HBCU graduates, they were excited to move out to the Bay Area to get started. Both black, they were also already tired of hearing about the lack of racial diversity at tech companies (being a “unicorn” gets old fast).

Their conversations sparked a question, “Is there a group or a quick way for black tech interns to connect in Silicon Valley?”

When they couldn’t find the network they were envisioning, they created a chat on the mobile messaging app GroupMe–a community for black interns working at Silicon Valley technology companies to be able to share professional and academic resources and meet up in person. They whipped up a logo on Photoshop and named the group “Black Valley”. Within a couple of days, they’d virtually united 30 people.

Once they arrived in San Francisco, they looped in Morehouse College class of 2017 physics major Dakari Franklin–Paul’s roommate and a fellow Apple HBCU Scholar. From there, friends of friends were conversing in the group and inviting other interns they knew or met on the job to join, too.

By the end of the summer, the Black Valley GroupMe had ballooned to more than 540 black interns from Apple, Facebook, Google, Intel, Uber, and a host of other leading tech companies and startups.

“It’s amazing to see such diversity, charisma, and intelligence in one group that the world systematically tries to discredit,” says Jazmin, who interned at IBM. “It was magical.”

Read more at The Well

Jopwell helps America’s leading companies connect with and recruit Black, Latino/Hispanic, and Native American professionals and students at scale. Sign up to find your dream job.

House Passes Bill to Protect Unpaid Federal Interns From Discrimination

BE capitol_hill

(Image: Thinkstock)

On Monday, the House of Representatives passed a bill that will protect unpaid federal interns from discrimination in the workplace.

Currently, paid interns are covered under anti-discrimination policies but there is no law that protects unpaid interns, leaving them without backup if they face discrimination based on race, sex, age or religion. Under the proposed legislation, interns without pay will be allowed to sue the government if their civil rights are violated.

[RELATED: 100,000 Opportunities Initiative Touches Down in Chicago]

The bill, which is largely supported by Democrats, was passed in the Republican-controlled House Monday night and is now in the hands of the Senate, which is also controlled by Republicans.

“Allowing this kind of behavior to go unchecked can have serious consequences on the lives and careers of young people interested in government service, and I am encouraged that the House passed our bill with unanimous support,” The Huffington Post reports Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) saying in a statement.

Cummings, along with Reps. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) and Grace Meng (D-N.Y.), are also proposing two other bills that will extend civil rights protection to unpaid interns working in congressional offices and the private sector.

It’s no secret that employers rely heavily on interns to help with the operations of their business, but recently several companies have come under fire with discrimination lawsuits. Former interns at major companies like ICM, NBC Universal, Hearst Corporation and Fox Searchlight have filed lawsuits for unfair treatment. Employment law firm Outten & Golden, which advocates for workplace fairness, has even created the website UnpaidInternsLawsuit.com to offer assistance to any professional who held an unpaid internship within the last six years fight their case against discrimination.

So far, a few states including New York, California, Connecticut, Maryland, Oregon, as well as the District of Columbia, have passed laws to protect unpaid interns from discrimination and harassment.

10 Secrets To Training Summer Interns

Small and large companies alike benefit from having summer interns be a part of a team. Not only are they great additions to easing some the office work load but their opinions are valuable. What’s more when you hire the right interns you might end up growing your batch of promising entry-level employees. Studies show that more than half of interns hired by companies are still working for those same companies five years later.

At the same time, business owners have to be very careful about using unpaid interns as free labor. Meaning, business owners have to make sure that their internship program—paid or unpaid—complies with labor laws.

[Related: 5 Things Your Need To Know: Hiring Interns]

Interns can be a great asset to your business as long as you are available for constant support.  So, what is the one best tip for training summer interns as seamlessly and quickly as possible? That was the question posed to members of the You

ng Entrepreneur Council (YEC), an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched BusinessCollective, a free, virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses. The following are their responses:

Plan Ahead

“Have a plan and lay it out clearly before they begin. Copying interns on emails prior to their start date has proven to be helpful. Also, ensure they have someone to shadow so they can hit the ground running. ”

Ashley Mady
Brandberry

Make Everything Transparent

“Provide interns with complete transparency on company initiatives, even if it doesn’t relate to their job spec or day to day tasks. I’ve found companies hold back on what they share with interns. But if you provide the same level of transparency you provide employees, interns tend to learn quicker, feel more tied into the organization and empowered to work harder on their projects.”

Andrew Fayad
eLearning Mind

Have Them Write the Training Program

“We have had over 300 interns go through our program. To do this easily, you have to train the first intern and have their only job be to write up everything you taught them. Then have the second and third intern go through it and correct it with you. By the fourth, you have a perfect intern training manual.”

Vanessa Van Edwards
Science of People

Give Them Homework

“Before our interns start, we ask them to familiarize themselves with certain topics. That way, when they start, they have a good understanding of what tasks they will have and what they are expected to do.”

Michael Quinn
Yellow Bridge Interactive

Continue reading on the next page…

10 Secrets To Training Summer Interns

Small and large companies alike benefit from having summer interns be a part of a team. Not only are they great additions to easing some the office work load but their opinions are valuable. What’s more when you hire the right interns you might end up growing your batch of promising entry-level employees. Studies show that more than half of interns hired by companies are still working for those same companies five years later.

At the same time, business owners have to be very careful about using unpaid interns as free labor. Meaning, business owners have to make sure that their internship program—paid or unpaid—complies with labor laws.

[Related: 5 Things Your Need To Know: Hiring Interns]

Interns can be a great asset to your business as long as you are available for constant support.  So, what is the one best tip for training summer interns as seamlessly and quickly as possible? That was the question posed to members of the You

ng Entrepreneur Council (YEC), an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched BusinessCollective, a free, virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses. The following are their responses:

Plan Ahead

“Have a plan and lay it out clearly before they begin. Copying interns on emails prior to their start date has proven to be helpful. Also, ensure they have someone to shadow so they can hit the ground running. ”

Ashley Mady
Brandberry

Make Everything Transparent

“Provide interns with complete transparency on company initiatives, even if it doesn’t relate to their job spec or day to day tasks. I’ve found companies hold back on what they share with interns. But if you provide the same level of transparency you provide employees, interns tend to learn quicker, feel more tied into the organization and empowered to work harder on their projects.”

Andrew Fayad
eLearning Mind

Have Them Write the Training Program

“We have had over 300 interns go through our program. To do this easily, you have to train the first intern and have their only job be to write up everything you taught them. Then have the second and third intern go through it and correct it with you. By the fourth, you have a perfect intern training manual.”

Vanessa Van Edwards
Science of People

Give Them Homework

“Before our interns start, we ask them to familiarize themselves with certain topics. That way, when they start, they have a good understanding of what tasks they will have and what they are expected to do.”

Michael Quinn
Yellow Bridge Interactive

Continue reading on the next page…

Internship Finder: Interview with internrocket.com’s Michael Somers





Michael SomersJobs are not what they used to be for both employees and employers. The average worker stays at each position just 4.4 years, which leaves employers looking for new staff members at a rate drastically higher than that of just several decades ago. For the employee, the market has become more competitive and a college degree is no longer a guaranteed ticket to a profitable and happy career with a single company.

Due to the competition in the job marketplace, employers need help finding the best candidates for the job. Companies spend on average around $3,500 on each hire, which is the primary reason that talent acquisition has quickly turned into a $124 billion industry.

One startup tackling both sides of this problem is internrocket.com, co-founded by young entrepreneur Michael Somers. Michael describes internrocket.com as “a dating website, except for your career.” The site helps people find “quick projects to micro-invest in their future,” and can be described as an internship finder. These micro internships allow people to quickly test drive relationships at low risk. “It’s faster and less risky and ends up in a place where everyone understands the truth of the matter which allows people to make better decisions,” Michael said.

Getting the Engineers to Build the Rocket

Every Friday for two years, Michael and his team would leave their day jobs to head straight to hackathons they hosted to work and develop with the best coders in the area. “We started at 5pm each Friday and went until 5am on Saturday for about two years.” On average they would get between 10 and 15 programmers, two of which are now employed full-time by the startup.  “It was a fantastic way to eat our own dog food as they say.  We believe in getting to work quickly to cut through all the talk.  We think it brings the truth to light.  You know, is this actually going to work, the working relationship.  So we created a short, quick way to start working with programmers.  They come for a night and if it’s something they like and we like — they keep coming back.”

Michael Somers Team 2

Q: What’s the biggest mistake you’ve made as an entrepreneur so far?

A: Trying to will things into existence.

Job hunting is similar to dating, but it’s not approached by most job seekers in the same manner. “People don’t typically jump right into marriage…If you were to purchase a car, you wouldn’t typically purchase one blind unless you had a lot of experience.” There is a significant amount of pressure and uncertainty in both instances. Michael sees internrocket.com as that courtship period where both parties can get to know each other and see if there is a perfect match.

Michael Somers InternRocket

After creating a profile on internrocket.com, users can provide what line of work they want to go into and their confidence level of that decision. If a user is not 100% sure of their career choice, recommendations created by the site’s algorithm will help them explore several other types of careers in different industries to make sure they find what works for them. Users can then apply for and do the work all within the website in a matter of hours depending on the project. “You can quickly determine if this is the right fit.”

When asked what the end goal is for internrocket.com, Michael replied “[To ensure] everyone is doing what they’re designed to do.” The low risk for both parties and convenience of these opportunities make internrocket.com a startup to check out, and look out for.

Don’t self-destruct, take your day to the moon and listen to the full interview audio below!

Additional Interview Highlights

Q: What’s the biggest barrier you have had to overcome up to this point?

A: There have been many. I would say just getting the word out there. It’d be really easy to pour a ton of money into it, but we really believe deeply in organic growth and connecting with the right people.

Q: Is being a young entrepreneur an advantage or disadvantage?

A: I look at everything as an advantage. This is a fantastic advantage.

Q: What’s your advice to tech-based startups without a technical co-founder?

A: Get one!

Q: What’s your best overall piece of advice for young entrepreneurs?

A: Focus on the customer.

Q: How many hours do you work a week on internrocket.com?

A: Sometimes it’s 100 hour work-week, sometimes it’s a 20 hour work week. Just trying to do what I need to do on a daily bases and let the chips fall where they may.

Listen to the full interview here:





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5 Reasons Why I Pay My Interns (And You Should Too)





PayInterns

Unpaid internships are, in my opinion, a blight infecting the modern American economy. I understand why companies offer them, and if they were truly a way for those entering the workforce to get some real world experience by taking on a light work load within their chosen field, I might even support them. But they aren’t – instead, unpaid internships have become a way for businesses to get free labor. And we aren’t talking about one or two faceless corporations taking advantage of a crummy system either, this problem is endemic; the prevalence of lawsuits in the news that are filed by unpaid interns show that. I made it a personal mission to be part of the force fighting against the tide of unpaid internships, and I pay every intern I hire for five reasons.

1. Not paying your interns could be illegal.

The United States Department of Labor knows that companies are taking advantage of unpaid internships, and there are strict restrictions on what can qualify as an ‘unpaid internship.’  Among other qualifications, the job training has to be similar to what would be given in an educational environment, the internship must benefit the intern, and the employer cannot derive immediate advantage from the activities of the intern. In other words, if the intern is engaged in any sort of productive work – sales, clerical duties, and customer service – they are likely entitled to a wage, and you could find yourself in hot water.

2. Paid internships attract more candidates

According to a study done by internmatch.com, an online internship advertising service, paid internship postings get clicked on 2.5 times more than unpaid postings. Good, hard-working candidates will gravitate more towards a job that rewards them for their work than one that won’t give them a dime. Some of my best employees have come to MyCorp through paid internships, and I am consistently astounded at the quality of the work my interns produce.

3. Interns that get a paycheck are more likely to find a job.

The whole point to an internship is to help a student get experience, and at some point, a full-time job. However, you are hurting your interns if you are not paying them. The National Association of Colleges and Employers found that 63.1% of paid interns received a job offer after graduating, versus 37% of unpaid interns. There are likely different reasons for this discrepancy, but I’m sure a large part of it has to do with the type of work paid interns do. Paid interns are more engaged with their job, and can legally be given the type of work that actually benefits the company. And when you are looking for potential hires, you probably want the candidate with real experience, rather than the one that made copies and went on Starbucks runs.

4. Unpaid labor is bad for society.

Internaware, an intern rights group in England, found that 30% of employees surveyed had previously interned for the company they now work for. Internships are a good idea, but when you don’t pay your interns, you force them to shoulder the burden of living near, or commuting to, the office. If your start-up doesn’t have any money coming in, even scraping together enough cash to fill your gas tank can be a serious hurdle, and there are plenty of interns forced to either sponge of their parents or take on extra loans just to be able to survive while they finish an unpaid internship. Even if your company is inches away from the red, you should at the very least provide a metro card, or some extra money for gas.

5. It is the right thing to do.

Paying your interns is, morally, the right thing to do. I’ve heard and read different analysts moan about the privilege and entitlement of interns pushing for pay, and I think it is ridiculous. When did it become okay to not pay people for their work? The minute an intern shows how helpful and proactive they can be to growing the business, they deserve a wage. Interns are not the 1% – they are students with loans trying to make ends meet. What works for me may not work for everyone, but I earnestly believe in being paid a fair day’s wage for a fair day’s labor. After all, I wouldn’t be where I am if it wasn’t for the hard work of all of my employees, including my interns.

Deborah Sweeney is the CEO of MyCorporation.com. MyCorporation is a leader in online legal filing services for entrepreneurs and businesses, providing start-up bundles that include corporation and LLC formation, registered agent, DBA, and trademark & copyright filing services. MyCorporation does all the work, making the business formation and maintenance quick and painless, so business owners can focus on what they do best. Follow her on Google+ and on Twitter @deborahsweeney and @mycorporation.

Image Credit: blog.kissmetrics.com 





The post 5 Reasons Why I Pay My Interns (And You Should Too) appeared first on Under30CEO.

5 Reasons Why I Pay My Interns (And You Should Too)





PayInterns

Unpaid internships are, in my opinion, a blight infecting the modern American economy. I understand why companies offer them, and if they were truly a way for those entering the workforce to get some real world experience by taking on a light work load within their chosen field, I might even support them. But they aren’t – instead, unpaid internships have become a way for businesses to get free labor. And we aren’t talking about one or two faceless corporations taking advantage of a crummy system either, this problem is endemic; the prevalence of lawsuits in the news that are filed by unpaid interns show that. I made it a personal mission to be part of the force fighting against the tide of unpaid internships, and I pay every intern I hire for five reasons.

1. Not paying your interns could be illegal.

The United States Department of Labor knows that companies are taking advantage of unpaid internships, and there are strict restrictions on what can qualify as an ‘unpaid internship.’  Among other qualifications, the job training has to be similar to what would be given in an educational environment, the internship must benefit the intern, and the employer cannot derive immediate advantage from the activities of the intern. In other words, if the intern is engaged in any sort of productive work – sales, clerical duties, and customer service – they are likely entitled to a wage, and you could find yourself in hot water.

2. Paid internships attract more candidates

According to a study done by internmatch.com, an online internship advertising service, paid internship postings get clicked on 2.5 times more than unpaid postings. Good, hard-working candidates will gravitate more towards a job that rewards them for their work than one that won’t give them a dime. Some of my best employees have come to MyCorp through paid internships, and I am consistently astounded at the quality of the work my interns produce.

3. Interns that get a paycheck are more likely to find a job.

The whole point to an internship is to help a student get experience, and at some point, a full-time job. However, you are hurting your interns if you are not paying them. The National Association of Colleges and Employers found that 63.1% of paid interns received a job offer after graduating, versus 37% of unpaid interns. There are likely different reasons for this discrepancy, but I’m sure a large part of it has to do with the type of work paid interns do. Paid interns are more engaged with their job, and can legally be given the type of work that actually benefits the company. And when you are looking for potential hires, you probably want the candidate with real experience, rather than the one that made copies and went on Starbucks runs.

4. Unpaid labor is bad for society.

Internaware, an intern rights group in England, found that 30% of employees surveyed had previously interned for the company they now work for. Internships are a good idea, but when you don’t pay your interns, you force them to shoulder the burden of living near, or commuting to, the office. If your start-up doesn’t have any money coming in, even scraping together enough cash to fill your gas tank can be a serious hurdle, and there are plenty of interns forced to either sponge of their parents or take on extra loans just to be able to survive while they finish an unpaid internship. Even if your company is inches away from the red, you should at the very least provide a metro card, or some extra money for gas.

5. It is the right thing to do.

Paying your interns is, morally, the right thing to do. I’ve heard and read different analysts moan about the privilege and entitlement of interns pushing for pay, and I think it is ridiculous. When did it become okay to not pay people for their work? The minute an intern shows how helpful and proactive they can be to growing the business, they deserve a wage. Interns are not the 1% – they are students with loans trying to make ends meet. What works for me may not work for everyone, but I earnestly believe in being paid a fair day’s wage for a fair day’s labor. After all, I wouldn’t be where I am if it wasn’t for the hard work of all of my employees, including my interns.

Deborah Sweeney is the CEO of MyCorporation.com. MyCorporation is a leader in online legal filing services for entrepreneurs and businesses, providing start-up bundles that include corporation and LLC formation, registered agent, DBA, and trademark & copyright filing services. MyCorporation does all the work, making the business formation and maintenance quick and painless, so business owners can focus on what they do best. Follow her on Google+ and on Twitter @deborahsweeney and @mycorporation.

Image Credit: blog.kissmetrics.com 





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4 Mistakes of Managing Seasonal Interns





Internship MistakesShould you hire an intern this season or forgo the concept altogether? This can be a tricky question. On one hand, seasonal interns can prove helpful in a small business setting. They can assist with non-critical tasks around the office, add young spirit into a company and cost a business owner next to nothing.

On the other hand, bringing on a seasonal intern can also turn into a nightmare if not managed properly. Here are a few practices to avoid.

Mistake #1: Launching a program without a plan

Hillary Clinton once famously said, “Fail to plan, plan to fail.” She was right.

Fight against failure by sitting down with your management team and hashing out a detailed description of your internship program. What will your intern do on a daily basis? Will the person shadow a high performer or member of the management team? Will there be enough work for that person to do for the entire season or should you hire them part-time? Who will manage their day-to-day progress? Post an internship ad only after you’ve established a firm plan.

Mistake #2: Hiring too young

Not all interns are created equal, especially when it comes to age. The younger the intern candidate, the more likely they may treat the experience like summer camp. Business owners are smart to pay attention to resumes that come in from people in late college (juniors or seniors) or older.

Planning to soon beef up your staffing levels? Is so, silently treat the internship like an extended job interview and consider asking them to apply for full-time role after graduation.

Mistake #3: Forgetting to check compensation laws

Be careful when you hire an unpaid intern. According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Fair Labor Standards Act, businesses can only hire an unpaid intern if the job description fits every one of the following criteria.

-          Training needs to focus less on your business’s operations and more on the specific skills your program offers (i.e. sales, accounting, marketing). Training should be academic in nature.

-          Training should be designed to help the intern regardless if that person stays on with your company full-time or not. Training should solely benefit the intern.

-          Interns should not displace normal staffers. Instead, interns should be a welcome addition to a team, not a vehicle to avoid paying overtime to regular employees. (Read: Interns shouldn’t be picking up the slack of day-to-day operations.)

-          Businesses with unpaid interns should derive no benefit from the activities of the intern. The benefit should be only work experience for the intern.

-          Interns should not be guaranteed a paid job after the completion of an unpaid program. This presumes the intern was exploited for free labor.

-          Unpaid means unpaid. Business owners are advised not to give money to an unpaid intern in return for training or time worked if/when the intern is hired full-time.

Mistake #4: Failing to offer (consistent) feedback

Most interns come straight from school where they were on the receiving end of constant feedback from teachers and counselors. This is the environment they are used to (and probably thrive in), so try to touch base with your intern on a regular basis to see how he or she is doing in your program.

Institute a 10-minute stand-up meeting every morning with your intern. Make the meeting informal. Discuss your expectations for the day, the prior day’s happenings and any successes/items to improve upon and then give your intern time to ask questions and provide you with feedback.

Yaniv Masjedi is the vice president of marketing at Nextiva (@Nextiva), a leading provider of cloud-based, unified communication services. In his role, Yaniv manages the firm’s marketing and branding efforts by working to create strategies that drive awareness, strengthen the Nextiva brand and share the story of the company’s unique customer-centric culture (dubbed “Amazing Service”). Keep up with Yaniv on Twitter @YanivMasjedi.

Image Credit: blog.cnm.org





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Black Lawmaker Under Fire for Statement about Female Interns

After making a shocking ‘snake’ statement to a 17 year old girl, Connecticut State Representative Ernest Hewett, who was demoted from his deputy speaker position, tried to explain himself to a newspaper and may have gotten himself into even more trouble, the Huffington Post reports.

 

Rep. Hewitt made reference to a ‘snake under his desk’ to a female high school senior who had told him she was afraid of snakes.”If you’re bashful, I got a snake sitting under my desk here,” the Hewett told her

He tried to convince the Hartford Courant that his record is completely clean of inappropriate behavior with females, saying

“I purposely will not have female interns. My intern now is a male. I want to keep it like that. I’ve had female interns in the past that sit in my office all day. I thought it was totally weird and I didn’t want another. As a matter of fact, I went four, maybe six years without having an intern at all because of stuff like that. I have a male intern, the last two I’ve had were male.”

He said it’s not completely in his control the gender of his interns but that he prefers not to be assigned females because “that way that keeps me good and that keeps everybody else good.”

Do you think he has a point?