How to Use LinkedIn Learning for Professional Development

How to Use LinkedIn Learning for Professional Development

Employee and professional training can be time consuming and expensive for organizations, especially small businesses. Having the courses available on video so they can be viewed over and over without additional cost is invaluable. And that is what LinkedIn Learning for professional development offers, unlimited access to a vast library of courses.

More than 10,000 video courses are now part of the LinkedIn Learning platform courtesy of Lynda.com, which was purchased by LinkedIn for $1.5 billion almost two years ago.

What is Lynda.com?

In order to better understand the service LinkedIn (NYSE:LNKD) is providing, it is important to know what Lynda.com is. As a video training/educational platform, Lynda.com is one of the top companies in the segment, with more than 20 years of experience and tutors that are experts in their respective fields. The company’s subscription model allows users to access its library anytime and anywhere on your computer, tablet or smartphone.

The subject matter covers the gamut, but some of them include programming, design, marketing, writing, management, business intelligence and much, much more.

How to Use LinkedIn Learning for Professional Development

For LinkedIn, this was a strategic purchase that has paid dividends right away as the company was struggling to increase its user base. The combination of the professional services it provides along with Lynda.com’s courses is a win/win, with the likes of Box, NBCUniversal, Viacom, Georgetown University and many others using the service.

So what’s the difference between LinkedIn Learning and Lynda.com?

First of all, the courses you get on Lynda.com are available on LinkedIn Learning. As far as content goes, they are one in the same. The difference is the way LinkedIn integrates its platform to personalize lessons based on the data the company has on your profile. This can include the company you work for, the industry you are in, your professional network, skills you might need and more. And once you learn these skills, you can add them to your profile to make yourself a more desirable target for companies looking for new talent.

How to Use LinkedIn Learning for Professional Development

LinkedIn Learning has personalized eLearning with unique insights that deliver relevant course recommendations. Using data from the LinkedIn network, users can identify courses that are relevant for developing new skills. For stakeholders looking to measure their investment in the platform, administrative tools include analytics about learner adoption, participation, and more with downloadable reports for evaluating different metrics.

LinkedIn has basically taken the same approach to the subscription model as Lynda.com. The only difference is you get many of the professional services that are part of the different tiers the company provides. But no matter which one you pay for, you will be able to access all of the courses in the Lynda.com library.

How to Use LinkedIn Learning for Professional Development

All the plans come with a no commitment free month, which you can cancel at any time. If you want to continue, the Career, Business, Sales and Hiring plans are available for $24.99, $47.99, $64.99, and $99.95 per month respectively when billed annually.

Again it is worth repeating, this gives you access to more than 10,000 expert-led, online courses and video tutorials you can access anytime you want.

Images: LinkedIn

This article, “How to Use LinkedIn Learning for Professional Development” was first published on Small Business Trends

Long-Time Oracle Staffer Quits After CEO Praises Trump

Oracle

A member of Oracle’s Cloud division took to LinkedIn to write his resignation from the company.

George A. Polisner wrote, “I must resign from this once great company,” in response to statements made by Safra A. Catz, an Oracle executive, at a meeting hosted by the president-elect with leaders from Silicon Valley at Trump Tower.

After meeting with Trump, Catz wrote in an emailed statement to The Washington Post, “I plan to tell the president-elect that we are with him and are here to help in any way we can,” after she was asked what she planned to tell Trump, during the meeting.

“If he can reform the tax code, reduce regulation, and negotiate better trade deals, the U.S. technology community will be stronger and more competitive than ever.”

According to The Washington Post, Catz is a Republican who has known Trump prior to the meeting. Catz has since been recruited to join Trump’s transition team.

That was enough for Polisner. He threw Catz’s words back at her, writing in his LinkedIn post, “I am not with President-elect Trump, and I am not here to help him in any way. In fact–when his policies border on the unconstitutional, the criminal and the morally unjust–I am here to oppose him in every possible and legal way.”

Polisner also created an online petition calling on Oracle to stand against Trump. In his petition he wrote:

“Donald Trump, is the son of a wealthy real estate developer and racist, Fred Trump. Trump has suggested violence against his opponent and he has stated that if he doesn’t win the election it must be rigged (which is incendiary in the America of today). He has continued to attack immigrants calling Mexicans criminals and rapists while suggesting that we ban Muslims from entering our country. He’s talked about torturing prisoners of war and killing their families -actions that would be major violations of international law (aside from being morally and ethically wrong). He disrespected a father who lost his son in the Iraq war. He has continually denigrated women—claiming sexual assault in the military is expected and that women must rely upon their sex appeal to progress their careers.”

 

Long-Time Oracle Staffer Quits After CEO Praises Trump

Oracle

A member of Oracle’s Cloud division took to LinkedIn to write his resignation from the company.

George A. Polisner wrote, “I must resign from this once great company,” in response to statements made by Safra A. Catz, an Oracle executive, at a meeting hosted by the president-elect with leaders from Silicon Valley at Trump Tower.

After meeting with Trump, Catz wrote in an emailed statement to The Washington Post, “I plan to tell the president-elect that we are with him and are here to help in any way we can,” after she was asked what she planned to tell Trump, during the meeting.

“If he can reform the tax code, reduce regulation, and negotiate better trade deals, the U.S. technology community will be stronger and more competitive than ever.”

According to The Washington Post, Catz is a Republican who has known Trump prior to the meeting. Catz has since been recruited to join Trump’s transition team.

That was enough for Polisner. He threw Catz’s words back at her, writing in his LinkedIn post, “I am not with President-elect Trump, and I am not here to help him in any way. In fact–when his policies border on the unconstitutional, the criminal and the morally unjust–I am here to oppose him in every possible and legal way.”

Polisner also created an online petition calling on Oracle to stand against Trump. In his petition he wrote:

“Donald Trump, is the son of a wealthy real estate developer and racist, Fred Trump. Trump has suggested violence against his opponent and he has stated that if he doesn’t win the election it must be rigged (which is incendiary in the America of today). He has continued to attack immigrants calling Mexicans criminals and rapists while suggesting that we ban Muslims from entering our country. He’s talked about torturing prisoners of war and killing their families -actions that would be major violations of international law (aside from being morally and ethically wrong). He disrespected a father who lost his son in the Iraq war. He has continually denigrated women—claiming sexual assault in the military is expected and that women must rely upon their sex appeal to progress their careers.”

 

Digital Diversity Network Highlights Tech’s Top 40 Under 40

Image: Tiffany Price

Recently, the Digital Diversity Network made an unforgettable splash in Silicon Valley. First with an event held at the YouTube space, highlighting phenomenal women of color in technology and then culminating with the, 40 Under 40 – Tech Diversity – Silicon Valley, Awards held at Salesforce. Awardees graced the stage ranging from tech moguls to Facebook execs to the Bay Area’s social impact giant, Kapor Capital.

In case you missed it, without further ado, here are the top 40 Under 40, currently making waves in Tech Diversity in Silicon Valley.

NAME TITLE         COMPANY
1 Aaron Russell Sourcing Manager, Networking Engineering Facebook
2 Adjetey Clarence Lassey Enterprise Corporate Solutions Executive Salesforce.com
3 Albert Biketi VP & GM, Data Security Hewlett Packard Enterprise Software
4 Alexandria Lafci Co-Founder New Story Charity
5 Anita Blanco Director of Diversity & Inclusion in Genetics & Biosciences Stanford University
6 Bernard Gutmann Director, Corporate Strategy & Development Pandora
7 Breanna Zwart Policy & Partnerships, Emerging Markets Google
8 Brian Martinez Global Program Manager, Field Sales Airbnb
9 Darrell Jones, III Head of Business Development Clef
10 David Silva Founder Techqueria.org
11 Ebony Frelix SVP, Philanthropy & Engagement Salesforce.com
12 Erica Joy Baker Build & Release Engineer Slack
13 Idalin Bobe IT Consultant | Social Justice Activist | Community Manager Thoughtworks
14 Jamal Eason Product Manager Google
15 Jason Mayden Founder, CEO, Designer Accel Partners
16 Jason Towns CEO & Managing Director Groundwork
17 Joe Vasquez Founding Director Michelson Runway Accelerator
18 Julia Collins Co-Founder and Co-CEO Zume Pizza
19 Justin Steele Principal Google.org
20 Kamilah Taylor Senior Software Engineer LinkedIn
21 Lajuanda Asemota Director for Diversity & Inclusion Singularity University
22 Lance Coleman Content & Venture Advisor Binary Capital
23 Laura Gomez CEO Atipica
24 Leandrew Robinson CEO & Co-founder Hingeto
25 Lilibeth Gangas Chief Technology Community Officer Kapor Center for Social Impact
26 Maci Peterson Co-founder & CEO On Second Thought, Inc.
27 Maisha Gray-Diggs Group Manager, Litter/Coal Innovation The Clorox Company
28 Makinde Adeagbo Founder & CEO /dev/color
29 Mandela Schumacher-Hodge Founding Portfolio Services Director Kapor Capital
30 Megan Rose Dickey Reporter TechCrunch
31 Mercedes Bent Vice President of Education Upload VR
32 Monique Woodard Venture Partner 500 Startups
33 Morgan DeBaun CEO & Founder Blavity
34 Robert Harmon, Jr. Deputy General Counsel & Director Tesla Motors, Inc.
35 Sean Heywood Product Partnerships – Messenger Facebook
36 Shauntel Poulson Co-Founder and General Partner Reach Capital
37 Tiffani Ashley Bell Executive Director The Human Utility (formerly Detroit Water Project)
38 Trevor Thomas General Partner Cross Culture Ventures
39 Tristan Walker Founder & CEO Walker & Co.
40 Wilson White Senior Counsel, Public Policy & Government Relations Google

 

In addition to this list, Marc Hannah, Ph.D., was presented with the Game Changer of the Year Award and Rachel Williams, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Yelp, was presented with the Influencer Award, presented by Digital Diversity Network COO Kathy A. Johnson. During her acceptance speech, Williams promptly gave credit back to her fellow Awardees, “Everybody who stands before me in this room is an influencer. We are all changing the game.”

 

 

 


Sequoia Sequoia Blodgett is the Technology Editor for Black Enterprise, Silicon Valley. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform, focused on personal development, guided by informed, pop culture.

LinkedIn Becomes Locked Out in Russia

LinkedIn Blocked in Russia

LinkedIn’s network just got a little smaller following a blocking order by a court that ruled that the social network had violated a law on data storage.

Russia’s communications regulator Roskomnadzor ordered ISP’s to block LinkedIn (NYSE:LNKD) after a Moscow court upheld an earlier ruling that LinkedIn breached Russian privacy laws.

Some ISP’s have already cut access to the site, which has more than six million members in Russia.

The legislation has triggered a whole lot of criticism from both inside and outside Russia. Some of the players are actually seeing the new rules as the beginning of an end of their digital business in Russia.

Russia on the other hand says that it only seeks to protect its citizen’s personal data. Many have however disputed this reasoning saying that Russia only wants an easier route to access that data for itself.

More over, the country has in recent days been accused of a number of high-profile hacking cases like the recent breach of the Democratic National Committee servers. Those investigations are still on going.

Why Was LinkedIn Blocked in Russia?

The legislation requiring all social networks to store the personal data of Russian citizens on Russian servers was introduced in 2014. However, it is the first time we are seeing the law being enforced against a US-based social network.

Could Russia’s move be an indication of the resurgence of national sovereignty in the digital sphere? Could it also be a warning for global businesses that tomorrow’s internet might be far more fragmented than yesterday’s?

LinkedIn Photo via Shutterstock

This article, “LinkedIn Becomes Locked Out in Russia” was first published on Small Business Trends

SBA Joins Silicon Valley In Closing Investment Gap For Minority-Owned Businesses

SBA

The racial and gender makeup of investment boards is tied directly to the investment decisions they make, especially when it comes to funding companies led by people of color or female founders, according to a new study released by the U.S. Small Business Administration.

SBA Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet highlighted the importance of the findings, stating in a press release, “I have made it a top priority as SBA Administrator to ensure that firms led by women and underrepresented groups are able to reach their full potential. I know some of these challenges firsthand. Unfortunately, startups owned by women and minorities often face an even more daunting challenge accessing the capital they need to grow and prosper. This study confirms that challenge but it also shows that we can expand opportunity and increase our overall economic strength by ensuring more women and underrepresented groups are in a position to make major investment decisions.”

SBA Partners With LinkedIn

Contreras-Sweet also announced a new public-private partnership with LinkedIn and other organizations called Open Network for Board Diversity (ONBOARD). This coalition will work to expand the presence of underrepresented groups on high growth small business advisory boards, boards of directors, and increase diversity in small business leadership, particularly for those supported by Small Business Investment Companies (SBICs). The SBA’s new partnership with LinkedIn is intended to build diversity on corporate and investment boards and closing the investment gap for women and people of color.

With over 450 million members and more than 2 million groups using its service, LinkedIn is able to provide a platform to convene organizations and leaders committed to increasing access for diverse candidates to join boards, according to a press statement. Active members of the group are expected to benefit from exposure to SBICs and member institutions as well as information and insights shared by other members of the group. As a community-led initiative, partner organizations are to help curate relevant content and foster participation.

Racial and Gender Funding Patterns

The goal of the study was to find answers to challenging questions regarding lending patterns to women and minority-owned businesses and return on investment for SBICs. The report was produced by John Paglia, associate dean and professor of finance at Pepperdine Graziadio School of Business and Management; and, David T. Robinson, professor of finance at Duke University Fuqua School of Business, senior research strategist at the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, and advisory board member for the Private Equity Research Consortium.

“There is still more to do, but from this research, it is clear women and minority leaders at small business investment companies play an important role in bridging a lending gap to women and minority-owned small businesses,” said Paglia in a press statement. Identifying these relationships at the investment company level helps to close that gap, and we’re honored to lend our expertise in private capital and finance to this important effort to promote diversity in small business financing.”

BE Smart Hackers Visit Silicon Valley Corporate Sites

Be Smart

On Day 2 of the BE Smart Hackathon, sponsored by Toyota, all 10 student teams visited the Silicon Valley sites of two of the Black Enterprise TechConneXt Summit corporate sponsors: the AT&T Foundry and LinkedIn.

AT&T Foundry

The AT&T Foundry outdid itself again this year. Separating the students into three groups of roughly 15, each group engaged in an activity with the AT&T Foundry staff.

The first activity required the group of 15 to break into three teams. Each team had to tape strands of spaghetti together out from the edge of a table; the team that constructed the longest strand without its touching the floor would win.

Each team approached the challenge differently. Reflection was also part of the activity, as was learning from what other teams had done. One team’s spaghetti strand reached a length of 7 inches without touching the floor!

Tarren Corbett-Drummond, the Foundry’s senior product marketing innovation manager, said that of other groups that have performed this challenge, kindergartners did better than many adults. She also said that engineers and architects did best.

A provocative second activity, developed by the Foundry’s data scientists, involved machine learning and how constructing machine learning models requires knowing some of the answers already. Reinforcement learning can be used when you don’t the answer.

LinkedIn

At LinkedIn the students learned how to optimize their LinkedIn profiles. Emily Gause, a Howard alum who works at LinkedIn, provided great tips, including the following:

  • Don’t just “mass add” to your network. Add people strategically—those you can help professionally or who can help you.
  • LinkedIn isn’t Facebook. Make sure whatever you share on LinkedIn represents you as a professional.
  • Include a photo on your profile.
  • Use an attention-grabbing headline, not just “student at XYZ College.”
  • Write a compelling summary. This is the place where you can sell yourself. Be specific. Don’t be shy.
  • If you have another site where you blog or where you’ve already developed a following, link to that site from your LinkedIn profile (as long as it’s professionally appropriate).
  • Add to your profile volunteer experiences and causes you care about; 41% of hiring managers consider volunteer work to be as important as professional experience, according to LinkedIn.
  • Join LinkedIn groups.

Gause also suggested having a few people review your profile. The career services people I’ve interviewed all said they regularly helped students (and sometimes graduates) develop their LinkedIn profile.

Gause also said that even “locked” profiles aren’t off-limits to recruiters. Using a recruiter tool, recruiters can view private profiles—so be sure to keep yours professional.

For more about the BE Smart Hackathon, visit the Black Enterprise TechConneXt Summit website.

5 Ways to Get Thousands of Connections on LinkedIn (Really)

(Image: LinkedIn)

In her book, From Receptionist to Boss: Real-Life Advice for Getting Ahead at Work, Nicole Smartt explains how best to use social media (specifically LinkedIn) to effectively build your business and network.

If you have a professional career, you must be on LinkedIn. I try to devote an hour every day to it. That sounds like a lot of time, but you’ll actually be surprised at what you’ll get in return. As a top one percent LinkedIn member with 6,118 (and counting) connections, I’ve found this position leads to a number of great things: an expanded network, more exposure, and new business. In fact, customers often call and say they found me on LinkedIn. They read the articles I publish and promote there, or they learn about our Star brand and want to do business with a respected leader.

LinkedIn also does a couple of things better than any other platform out there right now: it connects professionals in a more useful way, and it connects them more easily to new networks. Endorsements, easily digestible descriptions of work done for clients, integrated resumes, and work examples all make LinkedIn an unpar­alleled tool for making great connections.

Most importantly, since I started dedicating an hour a day to LinkedIn (even on weekends), I’ve had a high return on invest­ment with job seekers reaching out to me, new clients wanting to do business, networks offering speaking opportunities, media outlets offering writing gigs, and my company’s own brand becoming better known. All these things equal money and exposure for me and for the company, at no cost. I’m not telling you these things to plug LinkedIn for its own sake. I’m telling you because this strategy has helped me, and it can help you.

Here are my favorite strategies for getting greater exposure on LinkedIn:

  • Start blogging. With LinkedIn’s Pulse, you’re able to post as many articles as you want. Writing content will increase your exposure, gain you followers, and help you be viewed as an expert. If you’re not yet an expert, research and become an expert on something.
  • Share, share, and share some more—but be strategic. Share content with friends and link to it in your email signature. Send articles to your connections letting them know that you’re thinking of them. I share one post a day on my status update as well as a few articles in different groups to attract a larger audience. Think about who would really benefit from this content, and then share it with that person.

Read more at www.businesscollective.com…

Nicole Smartt is the owner of Star Staffing. She is the youngest recipient to be awarded the Forty Under 40 Award, recognizing business leaders under the age of 40. Her book, From Receptionist to Boss: Real-Life Advice for Getting Ahead at Work, can be pre-ordered on her website at www.nicolesmartt.com.

BusinessCollective, launched in partnership with Citi, is a virtual mentorship program powered by North America’s most ambitious young thought leaders, entrepreneurs, executives and small business owners.

There’s More to Career Services than Job Placement

career services

I recently spoke with Andy Chan, vice president for Career Development at Wake Forest University, about the most effective ways to make use of campus Career Services offices. You can find that article here, but there was more useful information from our interview, so below find additional advice on Career Services best practices.

Do Career Services offices offer services to graduates?

It differs by school, but many offer a variety of services to help alumni move forward in their career process. On school websites you can look under alumni career services and find help writing a résumé, how to build your network, how to develop a LinkedIn profile, and how to use LinkedIn effectively.

So a lot of information is on the internet. The main difference is that the coaches available to help students on campus have limited time availability to help alumni. Some schools may not have a lot to offer, or they may refer you to an outside party for a small fee to access coaches if you need that.

The challenge is that the job search is a very lonely, independent process, so sometimes it’s helpful to be in community with other people who are going through it. Job search groups may be helpful because then it’s less lonely and you can see some people having success, instead of being completely on your own.

Is Career Services for the student who plans to go directly to grad school?

Many students have assumptions about grad school that are not completely accurate. So one thing that’s useful is to go to Career Services and express their interest in grad school and talk about why, and understand options in case they end up deciding not to go to grad school.

It’s good to practice your reasons for going, because why is the fundamental question asked on applications. Many Career Services offices offer services to help students practice their interviews for grad school or review their personal statement. We can help them find professors that know of students who attended grad school and the different options—they can bring up ways to think about what schools might be best for a student’s area of interest.

Career Services is not just for work. Career Services people know a lot of people, including alumni who went to grad school, so they can be effective at making connections.

There’s More to Career Services than Job Placement

career services

I recently spoke with Andy Chan, vice president for Career Development at Wake Forest University, about the most effective ways to make use of campus Career Services offices. You can find that article here, but there was more useful information from our interview, so below find additional advice on Career Services best practices.

Do Career Services offices offer services to graduates?

It differs by school, but many offer a variety of services to help alumni move forward in their career process. On school websites you can look under alumni career services and find help writing a résumé, how to build your network, how to develop a LinkedIn profile, and how to use LinkedIn effectively.

So a lot of information is on the internet. The main difference is that the coaches available to help students on campus have limited time availability to help alumni. Some schools may not have a lot to offer, or they may refer you to an outside party for a small fee to access coaches if you need that.

The challenge is that the job search is a very lonely, independent process, so sometimes it’s helpful to be in community with other people who are going through it. Job search groups may be helpful because then it’s less lonely and you can see some people having success, instead of being completely on your own.

Is Career Services for the student who plans to go directly to grad school?

Many students have assumptions about grad school that are not completely accurate. So one thing that’s useful is to go to Career Services and express their interest in grad school and talk about why, and understand options in case they end up deciding not to go to grad school.

It’s good to practice your reasons for going, because why is the fundamental question asked on applications. Many Career Services offices offer services to help students practice their interviews for grad school or review their personal statement. We can help them find professors that know of students who attended grad school and the different options—they can bring up ways to think about what schools might be best for a student’s area of interest.

Career Services is not just for work. Career Services people know a lot of people, including alumni who went to grad school, so they can be effective at making connections.