Saving Promise—The National Campaign to Stop Domestic Abuse

Saving Promise

“I come from a family of mothers and daughters, who survived over 60 years of domestic violence. It’s the story of my grandmother, my mother, myself, and my daughter. And it would be the story of my daughter’s little girl, whose name is Promise, that became the fifth generation, as she lay in bed next to my daughter while she was being strangled by Promise’s father.”

So began my astonishing interview with L.Y. Marlow, founder of Saving Promise, the national campaign to stop intimate partner violence.

 

Saving Victims of Domestic Violence

 

Marlow grew up in poverty, but went to school for 16 years at night, eventually earning three degrees, including an M.B.A. After enjoying more than 20 years in a corporate career that included technology, engineering, and project management and a stint at IBM, Marlow walked away from it all to start Saving Promise.

“The organization takes a holistic perspective,” Marlow told me, noting that domestic abuse has deep root causes.

“There are men abusers, but women abusers, too—men are also victims of abuse.” Marlow also notes that abuse isn’t always physical; it can be psychological, sexual, verbal, or financial.

“What I’m most excited about, though, is our new partnership with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. This partnership will develop a learning lab to research and better study domestic violence, and put forth greater education, prevention, policies, and the like to change the trajectory of this global health crisis,” Marlow says.

 

‘Where People Live, Work, Play, and Pray’

 

The organization, whose whole focus is prevention, is taking a multi-disciplinary approach. “We want to reach people where they live, work, play, and even pray,” says Marlow.

In addition to targeting public and private schools, Saving Promise is also working with the healthcare sector and the workplace. However, schools are an important target. Marlow says, “Young people ages 13–28 experience the most intimate partner violence.”

She also categorizes this abuse as a health crisis, because the impact on health can be severe. “Domestic violence causes chronic and communal diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes,” Marlow says. “It also causes PTSD and other mental health issues.”

Women of color are disproportionately impacted by domestic violence, Marlow says, citing a statistic that black women are three times more likely to be abused by an intimate partner.

For more about the important work of Saving Promise, visit its website.

Meet Former Mayor Turned Cannabis Business Tells All – Need Credit

chris brown

Former Mayor of Hawthorne, California, and cannabis enthusiast Chris Brown, recently chatted with Black Enterprise on how he got into the cannabis consulting business. Brown shares his vast knowledge of the cannabis space, plus how he’s banking big bucks as an investor and the cannabis industries people can pursue.

You are the CMO for the FOXX firm, a leading cannabis law firm in California. How does the FOXX firm work with the local government to write and improve policy for cannapreneurs?

We help local municipalities that are interested in medical cannabis write ordinances that will fit their financial needs. Most cities that we help are in some financial difficulty and need millions of additional revenue. Legalization of medical cannabis is a very lucrative business that will fill their budget shortfalls and create hundreds, if not thousands, of new jobs within the city.

Before the FOXX firm helped the city of Adelanto, California, legalize cultivation, the city was allegedly on the “brink of bankruptcy.” How did your counsel on medicinal marijuana help turn the city around? Was there any pushback from the community?

Freddy Sayegh, CEO and managing partner of the Foxx Firm helped the city attorney of Adelanto write the ordinance as well as came up with a tax structure that would fill the city budget deficit within the first year. At $10 a square foot, the city is looking at nearly 1 million-square-feet of cultivation and manufacturing; they will bring in nearly $10 million in revenues for the city budget and infrastructure.

One of your contracts is with Speed Weed, dubbed the No. 1 medical marijuana delivery company in the U.S., according to Forbes. Why did you choose to work with this brand, as opposed to some of the other cannabis delivery companies?

Speed Weed kind of reminds me of the Uber of medical marijuana. They have nearly 30,000 customers in California and are looking to expand nationally in every city that has legalized cannabis. They have been through all the growing pains a major corporation has.  Even cities like L.A. have changed their laws to try to stop them from growing. It’s a true testament of who they are and how big they will become. They will become a billion-dollar company within the next two to three years.

How necessary and lucrative is the consulting end of the cannabis industry?

Extremely necessary. A lot of local governments have a lot of red tape to go through to get business done. Having had been an elected official, I understand exactly how frustrating it can be waiting on a city to pass an ordinance. I help individuals and companies weather that storm. A consultant can calm the waters and give you a clear understanding of the process. In terms of being lucrative, it all depends on the deal you make with your client. At first, I thought making six figures helping individuals and companies get licenses was lucrative until I had a company offer me proper unity. LG Ventures, owned by Mark Tung, offered 12.5% ownership to my consulting firm, CB Strategies L.L.C. LG Ventures will be breaking ground on a 30,000-square-foot, two-story facility this summer that will bring nearly $33 million annually in revenue per year, starting in 2017. With Speed Weed, I will receive 8% of net revenue for every new city, county, or state I open up for them. I’m also working with Green Point Group L.L.C., owned by Hab Haddad, to bring a couple of larger cultivation companies from the East Coast to Southern California. Some of his clients have facilities more than 100,000-square feet of cultivation and research.

What has been the most difficult part of working in the industry, and the most rewarding?

One of the most difficult parts of working in this industry is the perception. Going from mayor to marijuana consultant was a bit rocky at first. But after closing your first deal, you care less. Cannabis helps millions of people around the world fight cancer, PTSD, and many other diseases. I’m happy to be a part of the forefront of this new revolution.

How should cannabis entrepreneurs seek capital to grow or expand their business territory and/or work with someone with your vast expertise?

Hire a consultant! Getting a license should be your No. 1 priority before raising money to cultivate. I guarantee once you receive a license or a CUP (Conditional Use Permit), investors will start calling you. A business plan is everything in this business. So, if you have a license or a CUP and a business plan, funding will come. Having a cultivation license is more lucrative than owning a casino! Just think about it, how many 30,000-square feet casinos are bringing in $3 million a month? Not many.

You’ve successfully transitioned from a career in government to a career in cannabis. Why cannabis, why now?

Why not cannabis! I may be the first former elected official to move over to this field. This industry will due more than $100 billion nationally over the next 10 years. Let alone all the medical benefits it brings to patients throughout the world. It’s prohibition of the 1920’s being unlocked to entrepreneurs. With the help of Speed Weed, Freddy Sayeh, Hab Hadded, and Mike Sherman, the transition has been a great experience. When Gov. Jerry Brown of California pushed to pass AB 266 last September in the final week of the legislative year, I knew it was time.

MajorChrisBrown2

What other opportunities are there in the cannabis business for those who do not want to open their own delivery or dispensary company?

Medical research, delivery, manufacturing, packaging, advertising, and of course, my favorite, CONSULTING.

Is there anything else we should know?

Do not miss this opportunity. Ask your local government has it ever considered legalizing medical marijuana? Nearly one-third of the states have passed laws already. It happens every 100 years. Get a license now!

Learn more about Chris Brown by visiting the links below and follow him on Twitter @MayorChrisBrown

SpeedWeed.com

GreenPointGroupLLC.com

 

 

Meet Former Mayor Turned Cannabis Business Tells All – Need Credit

chris brown

Former Mayor of Hawthorne, California, and cannabis enthusiast Chris Brown, recently chatted with Black Enterprise on how he got into the cannabis consulting business. Brown shares his vast knowledge of the cannabis space, plus how he’s banking big bucks as an investor and the cannabis industries people can pursue.

You are the CMO for the FOXX firm, a leading cannabis law firm in California. How does the FOXX firm work with the local government to write and improve policy for cannapreneurs?

We help local municipalities that are interested in medical cannabis write ordinances that will fit their financial needs. Most cities that we help are in some financial difficulty and need millions of additional revenue. Legalization of medical cannabis is a very lucrative business that will fill their budget shortfalls and create hundreds, if not thousands, of new jobs within the city.

Before the FOXX firm helped the city of Adelanto, California, legalize cultivation, the city was allegedly on the “brink of bankruptcy.” How did your counsel on medicinal marijuana help turn the city around? Was there any pushback from the community?

Freddy Sayegh, CEO and managing partner of the Foxx Firm helped the city attorney of Adelanto write the ordinance as well as came up with a tax structure that would fill the city budget deficit within the first year. At $10 a square foot, the city is looking at nearly 1 million-square-feet of cultivation and manufacturing; they will bring in nearly $10 million in revenues for the city budget and infrastructure.

One of your contracts is with Speed Weed, dubbed the No. 1 medical marijuana delivery company in the U.S., according to Forbes. Why did you choose to work with this brand, as opposed to some of the other cannabis delivery companies?

Speed Weed kind of reminds me of the Uber of medical marijuana. They have nearly 30,000 customers in California and are looking to expand nationally in every city that has legalized cannabis. They have been through all the growing pains a major corporation has.  Even cities like L.A. have changed their laws to try to stop them from growing. It’s a true testament of who they are and how big they will become. They will become a billion-dollar company within the next two to three years.

How necessary and lucrative is the consulting end of the cannabis industry?

Extremely necessary. A lot of local governments have a lot of red tape to go through to get business done. Having had been an elected official, I understand exactly how frustrating it can be waiting on a city to pass an ordinance. I help individuals and companies weather that storm. A consultant can calm the waters and give you a clear understanding of the process. In terms of being lucrative, it all depends on the deal you make with your client. At first, I thought making six figures helping individuals and companies get licenses was lucrative until I had a company offer me proper unity. LG Ventures, owned by Mark Tung, offered 12.5% ownership to my consulting firm, CB Strategies L.L.C. LG Ventures will be breaking ground on a 30,000-square-foot, two-story facility this summer that will bring nearly $33 million annually in revenue per year, starting in 2017. With Speed Weed, I will receive 8% of net revenue for every new city, county, or state I open up for them. I’m also working with Green Point Group L.L.C., owned by Hab Haddad, to bring a couple of larger cultivation companies from the East Coast to Southern California. Some of his clients have facilities more than 100,000-square feet of cultivation and research.

What has been the most difficult part of working in the industry, and the most rewarding?

One of the most difficult parts of working in this industry is the perception. Going from mayor to marijuana consultant was a bit rocky at first. But after closing your first deal, you care less. Cannabis helps millions of people around the world fight cancer, PTSD, and many other diseases. I’m happy to be a part of the forefront of this new revolution.

How should cannabis entrepreneurs seek capital to grow or expand their business territory and/or work with someone with your vast expertise?

Hire a consultant! Getting a license should be your No. 1 priority before raising money to cultivate. I guarantee once you receive a license or a CUP (Conditional Use Permit), investors will start calling you. A business plan is everything in this business. So, if you have a license or a CUP and a business plan, funding will come. Having a cultivation license is more lucrative than owning a casino! Just think about it, how many 30,000-square feet casinos are bringing in $3 million a month? Not many.

You’ve successfully transitioned from a career in government to a career in cannabis. Why cannabis, why now?

Why not cannabis! I may be the first former elected official to move over to this field. This industry will due more than $100 billion nationally over the next 10 years. Let alone all the medical benefits it brings to patients throughout the world. It’s prohibition of the 1920’s being unlocked to entrepreneurs. With the help of Speed Weed, Freddy Sayeh, Hab Hadded, and Mike Sherman, the transition has been a great experience. When Gov. Jerry Brown of California pushed to pass AB 266 last September in the final week of the legislative year, I knew it was time.

MajorChrisBrown2

What other opportunities are there in the cannabis business for those who do not want to open their own delivery or dispensary company?

Medical research, delivery, manufacturing, packaging, advertising, and of course, my favorite, CONSULTING.

Is there anything else we should know?

Do not miss this opportunity. Ask your local government has it ever considered legalizing medical marijuana? Nearly one-third of the states have passed laws already. It happens every 100 years. Get a license now!

Learn more about Chris Brown by visiting the links below and follow him on Twitter @MayorChrisBrown

SpeedWeed.com

GreenPointGroupLLC.com

 

 

Meet Veteran and Cannabis Entrepreneur Tanganyika Daniel

Cannabis

CannabisAfter our “11 African American Cannabis Entrepreneurs You Should Know” story went live, we had no idea how many other black cannabis entrepreneurs would surface. Enter Tanganyika Daniel, Founder of Jayn Green, a cannabis-infused skincare line for men and women. We chatted with the military veteran and got the 411 on how Jayn Green sparked —no pun intended— her cannabis business guide The Canna Print, and the cannabis documentary she’s producing! 

1. Your cannabis-infused topical line Jayn Green had an interesting start, where was the idea sparked?

Green: I was actually at a 420 College trying to learn everything I could about the cannabis industry, and I was sitting next to this gentleman who applied a medicated topical on his hand right there in the classroom. The problem with the topical was that it had the worst pungent smell, and it got so bad that I got up and found another seat. When I moved seats my brain started going into overdrive because I was thinking that there had to be a better topical on the market that worked for pain, but smelled great as well.

2. How did you come up with your product offerings and what are the benefits of using your products?

I came up with the product offering by paying close attention to what was missing in the cannabis community. I noticed that not one cannabis company specifically catered to male consumers, and this was right around the time that I started to notice a trend of men with beards. Jayn Green products focus on providing unique all natural skincare products for men and women. Our products are compatible with most skin types to relieve common annoying conditions like eczema, rosacea, psoriasis, and much more.

Cannabis

3.You authored The Canna Print, a guide on getting started in the cannabis industry. What was the inspiration behind the book?

The inspiration behind the book came from the fact that people kept calling me asking me how I got started in the cannabis industry. I was looking online for places to send them for more information, but it was either not easily available or the books on the market were between $400-700. I personally didn’t mind paying for those resources because I know that this is the industry I want to be in, but I honestly didn’t feel comfortable recommending those options to my friends who I knew were still skeptical and unsure about the entire idea. So I just consolidated the information I had learned and published a book myself with the same information but at a drastically reduced price. Not only do you get direct fundamental information about the financial side, but also 50 plus health benefits, and as a bonus, the links are provided so that you can apply for a license in an interested state within the eBook.

4. More and more studies are showing that cannabis is a huge benefit to veterans suffering from PTSD, as a veteran what has been your experience with the herb and what are you doing to get more veterans access to the plant?

First of all, the majority of these terrifying stories that you hear from these veterans are completely true. None of us returned to the U.S. the way that we originally left. My experience with the herb is that it helps me to be a positive, successful, focused member of society. Between my PTSD, chronic back pain, and the added stress of being an entrepreneur, cannabis helps me function throughout the day and get a great night sleep to prepare me for the challenges of the next day. At the time, I didn’t know that I was self-medicating, but I did know that I was just ecstatic to find relief even if it was only temporary. In order to spread the word, I have joined several organizations like Weed For Warriors, 22TooMany and more to stop the 50 suicides committed by service members a day. These are all national organizations that meet in most major cities at least once a month, and once there we educate veterans on the power of cannabis. I make it my business to introduce at least two new veterans to these organizations a month, and even though I humbly exceed that record, I still feel like it’s just not enough.

5. Tell us about the documentary you’re co-producing, The Secret Life of Trimmers. What can viewers expect and what do you want them to take away from the documentary?

The Secret Life of Trimmers is a documentary that I’m producing that will be out at the end of this year that focuses on the community of individuals who harvest, trim, and manicure the plant. Most people who consume cannabis have no idea how it comes off the tree, the process it takes to get from seed to sale, or the stories behind the individuals who process the plant. These people only work during trim season, and after that, they live free and travel until the next season. They have this secret communal society where most of them are vegans, so they eat together, trim together, and sleep in close quarters all while trimming over 12 hour days. This story has never been told before, and I honestly can’t wait for the world to be educated on this secret community within the cannabis world. What I want viewers to take from the movie is not only a higher appreciation for your flower, but also the other employment opportunities and unique income streams available in this industry as well.

Racism and PTSD Linked

be news

Changes to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) could change how trauma due to racism is diagnosed in minorities.  The new guidelines say racism can cause Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) similar to that of soldiers after war.

Before today’s release of the newest edition of manual, racism was only recognized as a potential cause of PTSD when it was related to a specific incident, such as assault. But now more subtle instances of racism will be considered.

“The new criteria do open the door to this by acknowledging that a series of minor slights or series of what might be seen as lesser types of trauma can accumulate and result in trauma,” Dr. Monnica Williams told HuffPost Live host Marc Lamont Hill.

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Soldier’s War Within

(Image: ThinkStock)

The U.S. has been engaged in war for a decade. Thousands have been killed on both sides. The bill totals nearly $3 trillion. The objectives are murky at best, and have often faded from consciousness, as politics and economics took center stage in American media. While troops withdraw from Iraq and combat winds down in Afghanistan, the scars are still fresh. When U.S. soldier, Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, was accused of murdering 17 Afghan civilians in March, the nation refocused attention on the psychological effects war has had on soldiers.

For many veterans who’ve returned home from Iraq and Afghanistan, their personal war is far from over. They must learn to readjust to the pressures of civilian life, and learn to cope with traumatic memories of combat. Veterans are at higher risk for mental health problems, including post traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, suicide and substance abuse problems. Military suicide has also been in the news, prompting coverage and discussion over how the war has impacted those who engaged in combat. The number of suicides in the US Army rose by 80 percent after the United States launched the war on Iraq, according to figures asserted by American military doctors.

The circumstances of the recent wars are unique from previous periods of conflict like Vietnam and World War II. The dynamics of the military have changed. Women play a much larger role in military operations and a draft is no longer in place, so a smaller portion of the general population has served in combat. Of those who have enlisted, many soldiers, like Sgt. Bales, sign up for multiple tours with a large percentage remaining as reserves.

Tireak Tulloch was deployed to Kuwait in 2003 with the Marine Corps. He was called up again in June 2004 and left the military in 2008. “In a post 9/11 world, the reserves took on a whole new meaning,” he says. “Our reservists were deployed as much as active duty. As reservists we were civilians most of the time. You’re not on a base where you’re constantly training, you have responsibilities.”

As Tulloch returned to civilian life, things slowly began to unravel. “After I separated from the Marines in 2008, I hadn’t really taken the time to process the years of service, the multiple deployments and the changes that took place inside myself,” he says. “It started out fine. I was working, going to a school and I had a girlfriend. Things were going great. Over time everyday issues came up [that] I wasn’t addressing the way I would [when] I was still in the military.”

Tulloch sought support from veteran groups and attended a retreat for young veterans. “One of the things we do in the military very well is that we compartmentalize, putting thoughts in certain parts of your mind,” he continues. “The best way I can think of it is that out there in the field of combat you may lose a service member, but you can’t let that loss overwhelm you. You adapt to that environment. You address it in a way that allows you to survive. That same skill becomes problematic when you get out, because you’re not on a field of battle.”

Tulloch eventually worked his way through thanks to the help of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America [IAVA] and became a spokesperson for the organization. “After that first year of going through bumps and bruises, I felt that I needed to help myself and find ways to help others,” he says. Members of the IAVA are converging on Washington, D.C. this week on behalf of younger veterans for “Storm the Hill”. In a recent survey of its members, IAVA found that nearly 17 percent were unemployed as of January 2012. The survey also found 67 percent of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans don’t think the mental-health care received by troops and veterans is adequate.

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