Dr. William Pickard Discusses the Principles of Entrepreneurship

Dr. William Pickard

For the last 35 years, Dr. William F. Pickard has garnered a wealth of knowledge in entrepreneurship and business development. Now, the successful business leader is sharing his expertise in his new book, Millionaire Moves: Seven Proven Principles of Entrepreneurship.

Despite coming from humble beginnings, Pickard became the first person in his family to earn a four-year degree at Western Michigan University. He then went on to earn a Masters in Social Work from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University.

Today, Pickard serves as CEO and chairman for multiple enterprises, including VITEC L.L.C., Global Automotive Alliance L.L.C., Grupo Antolin-Wayne, ARD Logistics, L.L.C., and Commonwealth Regal Industries. He is also the owner of several McDonald’s franchises and co-owns five black-owned newspapers.

Pickard’s leadership, however, does not end in the business world. He also serves on the board of the National Urban League, and is a member of the Detroit Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

 

Dr. William Pickard (Image: Dr. William F. Pickard | Photo Credit: Myron Watkins II)

 

In an interview with Black Enterprise, Pickard opens up about his new book, which provides the tools needed to become successful millionaires for those who desire to learn. “If you have an open mind, a vision, and unbeatable faith, you will not only prevail, but soar,” he said, via email.

Below, Pickard shares more insight on his book, as well as useful advice for aspiring entrepreneurs:

 

BLACK ENTERPRISE: What is one of the most important principles mentioned in your book?

Pickard: I believe vision and attitude are imperative. Your mind has the capacity to unfold what you visualize and verbalize. A negative mind will never harvest positive results. Vision, attitude, and perception help crystalize dreams and motivate productivity, even during those most challenging times. Vision keeps you grinding when others are sleeping. Vision and attitude will bring you to the finish line. The Bible says, “Without vision, the people will perish.”

 

BE: What is one thing that entrepreneurs, especially millennials, can learn from the book?

Pickard: While grades are obviously important, they should never be an excuse. I was not an “A” student, nor do I consider myself the sharpest knife in the drawer. Yet, all of that made me hungry. It forced me to look beyond my limitations and believe in a bigger purpose and plan for my life.  People determine their own destiny. So, my book is for anyone, especially young entrepreneurs, who seek a roadmap to achieve success beyond their circumstances.

 

BE: What can people do to enhance their finances?

Pickard: One of the things I mention in my book is, “Wealthy people teach their children how to acquire. Rich people teach their children how to sell. Poor people teach their children how to buy.” To change our everyday financial situations, we must start with transforming our mindset.  That means adjusting our buying habits and educating ourselves on how to build wealth for ourselves, our family, and our community.

 

BE: What inspired you to write this book?

Pickard: Teaching has always been of love of mine. Years ago, I embraced the mantra, “Each one, reach one, teach one.”  It is an innate part of me to give back to my community. That is why I have been a guest lecturer at HBCUs and other colleges across the nation for decades.  With young people, whether at my McDonald’s or on college campuses, I always find myself in teachable moments. My book allows me to reach a broader audience by sharing the principles that made a difference in my own success. As someone who has been blessed in many ways, I hope my book will plant seeds of inspiration and determination for that person with a great idea, the student trying to find their way, or the employee who dreams of something bigger.

 

BE: Why is failure an important part of the journey to success?

Pickard: I talk about failure in my book, because nothing in life is foolproof or without risk. You will stumble, as I did, but you need to learn from your failures, and have a faith bigger than your own abilities. This is important because WE [as African Americans] must see beyond our circumstances, and shift our mindset to see success and build wealth. As a community, we continue to get left behind, and we only control 1% of the wealth in our country.  So, it is imperative that we propel ourselves beyond failures to build wealth and create a legacy for our families and our community.

 

Be on the lookout for more insightful tips based on Dr. Pickard’s seven principles, which will appear on BlackEnterprise.com over the next several weeks!

 


Selena HillSelena Hill is the Associate Digital Editor at Black Enterprise and the founder of Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio. You can hear Hill and her team talk millennial politics and social issues every Sunday at 11 a.m. ET.

Follow her on Instagram and Twitter at @MsSelenaHill.

Entrepreneurs—Don’t Make This Common Behavioral Mistake Like Everyone Else

sunk cost fallacysunk cost fallacy (Image: iStock/AnthiaCumming)

 

Have you ever sat through a really bad movie instead of walking out, because you didn’t want to waste the price of tickets? Or, have you worn a pair of shoes that really hurt your feet, but you wear them because they were really expensive?

These are all examples of sunk cost fallacy. BehavioralEconomics.com defines the term thoroughly:

“Individuals commit the sunk cost fallacy when they continue a behavior or endeavor as a result of previously invested resources (time, money or effort) (Arkes & Blumer, 1985). This fallacy, which is related to status quo bias, can also be viewed as bias resulting from an ongoing commitment. For example, individuals sometimes order too much food and then over-eat ‘just to get their money’s worth’. Similarly, a person may have a $20 ticket to a concert and then drive for hours through a blizzard, just because s/he feels that s/he has to attend due to having made the initial investment. If the costs outweigh the benefits, the extra costs incurred (inconvenience, time or even money) are held in a different mental account than the one associated with the ticket transaction (Thaler, 1999).”

Business schools have a saying about sunk cost fallacy: “Throwing good money after bad.” You can make an initial investment in your business—be it in people, money, or time—then not see results, but keep the same routines associated with that investment.

Businesses do this all the time. For example, they may keep a poorly performing employee, or they may pay a monthly fee for software that the business doesn’t really need because it initially took a lot of time and money to set the software up and train employees to use it.

Envato Tuts Plus, a tutorial website and marketplace, offers great advice on how not to fall into the trap of sunk cost fallacy, which can lead to bad business decision-making. Here are a few suggestions from its article, titled Sunk-Cost Fallacy: How to Avoid Bias Based on Past Decisions:

  • “Recognize a sunk cost when you see one. Every investment you’ve already made is money spent. No matter what choice you make today, you won’t be able to recover the sunk cost. So… what’s the best move you can make for the future?”
  • “Remember that ‘I’ve already put so much into this’ is not a valid reason for sticking with an expensive enterprise that isn’t working out.”
  • “Separate your personal pride from your business decisions. Would you look stupid walking away from that pet project you’ve put so much into? Possibly. But you’d look even worse in bankruptcy proceedings!”

 

It’s worth reading the entire post from Envato Tuts Plus to learn more about sunk cost fallacy and entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurs—Don’t Make This Common Behavioral Mistake Like Everyone Else

sunk cost fallacysunk cost fallacy (Image: iStock/AnthiaCumming)

 

Have you ever sat through a really bad movie instead of walking out, because you didn’t want to waste the price of tickets? Or, have you worn a pair of shoes that really hurt your feet, but you wear them because they were really expensive?

These are all examples of sunk cost fallacy. BehavioralEconomics.com defines the term thoroughly:

“Individuals commit the sunk cost fallacy when they continue a behavior or endeavor as a result of previously invested resources (time, money or effort) (Arkes & Blumer, 1985). This fallacy, which is related to status quo bias, can also be viewed as bias resulting from an ongoing commitment. For example, individuals sometimes order too much food and then over-eat ‘just to get their money’s worth’. Similarly, a person may have a $20 ticket to a concert and then drive for hours through a blizzard, just because s/he feels that s/he has to attend due to having made the initial investment. If the costs outweigh the benefits, the extra costs incurred (inconvenience, time or even money) are held in a different mental account than the one associated with the ticket transaction (Thaler, 1999).”

Business schools have a saying about sunk cost fallacy: “Throwing good money after bad.” You can make an initial investment in your business—be it in people, money, or time—then not see results, but keep the same routines associated with that investment.

Businesses do this all the time. For example, they may keep a poorly performing employee, or they may pay a monthly fee for software that the business doesn’t really need because it initially took a lot of time and money to set the software up and train employees to use it.

Envato Tuts Plus, a tutorial website and marketplace, offers great advice on how not to fall into the trap of sunk cost fallacy, which can lead to bad business decision-making. Here are a few suggestions from its article, titled Sunk-Cost Fallacy: How to Avoid Bias Based on Past Decisions:

  • “Recognize a sunk cost when you see one. Every investment you’ve already made is money spent. No matter what choice you make today, you won’t be able to recover the sunk cost. So… what’s the best move you can make for the future?”
  • “Remember that ‘I’ve already put so much into this’ is not a valid reason for sticking with an expensive enterprise that isn’t working out.”
  • “Separate your personal pride from your business decisions. Would you look stupid walking away from that pet project you’ve put so much into? Possibly. But you’d look even worse in bankruptcy proceedings!”

 

It’s worth reading the entire post from Envato Tuts Plus to learn more about sunk cost fallacy and entrepreneurship.

‘Elevation Strategist’ Zakiya Larry Shares Essential Marketing Tips

zakiya larry

Strategic marketing and branding are essential components of a successful business. Without these skills, it’s almost impossible to attract the attention or clientele you deserve, despite the quality of your goods or service. But just in case you haven’t mastered the art of converting Twitter users into loyal customers with just 140 characters, you can and should sign up for the 2017 Black Enterprise Entrepreneurs Summit.

During this annual event, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in the “Branding & Marketing Lab”—a workshop designed to help business owners learn how to target prospects in cost-effective ways and leverage media for increased influence, along with other branding techniques. Entrepreneurs will also learn how to effectively use online marketing tools and social media to drive sales and revenue.

This first-class session in marketing will be taught by Zakiya Larry, who specializes in elevating brands and their influence with media coaching, keynote speaking, and overall brand polishing. A highly sought-after media coach and award-winning PR executive, the self-described “Elevation Strategist” is also the CEO of Quest Media Training, a strategic communications firm that provides guidance in interview preparedness, strategic messaging, crisis communications, and public relations.

In the wake of the upcoming summit, Larry gave BLACK ENTERPRISE a preview of the tools and resources she plans to share during the Entrepreneur Summit’s “Branding & Marketing Lab.” The long-time Texas resident also talks about how and why Houston— the location for this year’s Entrepreneurs Summit—is America’s next great black business mecca.

 

What advice would you share with entrepreneurs, especially millennials, about marketing and branding themselves?

 

I always say, “Your brand is your promise.” First, decide what you are promising your audience. Then communicate your promise clearly and consistently on the strongest digital platforms for your following. Don’t create brand confusion by introducing your promise then randomly talking about a different side hustle or something that is inconsistent. Example: Promising uplifting content for millennials, then going on a rant about how you hate #fakefriends and constantly spilling or sipping #tea. Consistency, visual interest, and strategy are key for us millennials when branding in the digital age.

 

 

What are some of the tools, resources, and insights that you will share at the Entrepreneurs Summit?

 

I will share how to boost your business/brand’s influence for FREE, by mastering the media. I will also share how marketing and PR could help or hurt your brand, depending on how and when the two are used (and yes, they are VERY different).

 

Why has Houston been dubbed as America’s next great black business mecca?

 

Houston has an exciting mix of culture, innovation, flair, small businesses and major corporations. I also think the right environment for a black business mecca includes diversity in the industries that matter: from the senior staffs in education to leaders of city government. Houston fits this bill, too. Education creates the pipeline for strong business leaders, and black and brown guides are at the helm. Houston has also elected a black mayor who understands the business needs of people of color, but who clearly and passionately represents all Houstonians, creating an environment for everyone to win…the next black business mecca included.

 

REGISTER NOW to learn how to strategically and effectively market your company at the Entrepreneurs Summit, May 17–20 in Houston.

 

You can get a head start on what Larry will teach during her marketing lab session at the Entrepreneurs Summit by downloading this free gift: tip sheets to Be A Media Maven at www.ZakiyaLarry.com. You can also chat with Larry about media, elevating your brand, and even your mood, anytime @ZakiyaLarry on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 

 


Selena HillSelena Hill is the Associate Digital Editor at Black Enterprise and the founder of the award-winning talk show, Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio. You can hear Hill and her team talk millennial politics and social issues every Sunday at 11 a.m. ET.

Follow her on Instagram and Twitter at @MsSelenaHill.

Stop Fake News From Faking You and Your Brand Out

fake news

With current sensationalist headlines, such as Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President or Starbucks CEO: If You Support Traditional Marriage, We Don’t Want Your Business,” it is getting harder to know what is truth and what is fiction. This is especially the case for rushed, small business owners, who may just peruse the first article they see to keep their social media feeds current and active.

For one of my clients, it very quickly became apparent to him that the item about the Starbucks CEO’s supposed comment was not real. He tried to take it down from his personal feed, but the damage was already done. Many of his connections had already shared it from his original post.  He felt awful that he hadn’t taken the time to check into it and find the falsehood within the story. This is a problem that many small businesses face, and because of a lack of knowledge about how to avoid the pitfalls of fake news, they may end up feeding the beast by sharing misinformation.

Even worse, sharing fake news can affect your business. A constant stream of false news on your business feed can lead to a mistrust of your brand.  Social media is used to create not only your online presence, but it is also a form of trust building. Your content is designed to show your knowledge base in your particular area of expertise and build trust with current and potential customers.

So, how can you, the business owner, protect against fake news? When possible, hire a social media manager, who understands that it’s your online reputation at stake.  If hiring a social media manager is not an option, here are some other possibilities:

  1. Check to see where else the story appears. Checking on other mainstream channels is a good way of verifying that a story had substance.
  2. READ the article before you post it. These are the questions you should be asking, as you read the article all the way through:
    • Is the article poorly written?
    • Are there grammar issues that make you think, “Hmmm…Why didn’t an editor catch this?”
    • Are the purported facts verifiable?
  3. Consult with colleagues who are experts in the field.
    • Here is an Example: If you read an article that states, “ACA is repealed, and business owners who paid are getting a rebate for last year’s insurance expenses,” you could call your accountant or tax attorney before you started spending that supposed refund!
  4. Is the headline a clickbait headline? As Carl Sagan once said, “Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.”

For small business owners who don’t have the time to handle their business and take care of all this fact checking—when possible, ask a professional. It is our job to keep fake news out of your feed.


Wendy Pace is the founder of Pace Setting Media, a social media strategy agency. Pace holds a B.A. in Communications and Marketing from Hunter College. She credits her husband and children as motivation for getting up every day to face the world of social media.

Stop Fake News From Faking You and Your Brand Out

fake news

With current sensationalist headlines, such as Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President or Starbucks CEO: If You Support Traditional Marriage, We Don’t Want Your Business,” it is getting harder to know what is truth and what is fiction. This is especially the case for rushed, small business owners, who may just peruse the first article they see to keep their social media feeds current and active.

For one of my clients, it very quickly became apparent to him that the item about the Starbucks CEO’s supposed comment was not real. He tried to take it down from his personal feed, but the damage was already done. Many of his connections had already shared it from his original post.  He felt awful that he hadn’t taken the time to check into it and find the falsehood within the story. This is a problem that many small businesses face, and because of a lack of knowledge about how to avoid the pitfalls of fake news, they may end up feeding the beast by sharing misinformation.

Even worse, sharing fake news can affect your business. A constant stream of false news on your business feed can lead to a mistrust of your brand.  Social media is used to create not only your online presence, but it is also a form of trust building. Your content is designed to show your knowledge base in your particular area of expertise and build trust with current and potential customers.

So, how can you, the business owner, protect against fake news? When possible, hire a social media manager, who understands that it’s your online reputation at stake.  If hiring a social media manager is not an option, here are some other possibilities:

  1. Check to see where else the story appears. Checking on other mainstream channels is a good way of verifying that a story had substance.
  2. READ the article before you post it. These are the questions you should be asking, as you read the article all the way through:
    • Is the article poorly written?
    • Are there grammar issues that make you think, “Hmmm…Why didn’t an editor catch this?”
    • Are the purported facts verifiable?
  3. Consult with colleagues who are experts in the field.
    • Here is an Example: If you read an article that states, “ACA is repealed, and business owners who paid are getting a rebate for last year’s insurance expenses,” you could call your accountant or tax attorney before you started spending that supposed refund!
  4. Is the headline a clickbait headline? As Carl Sagan once said, “Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.”

For small business owners who don’t have the time to handle their business and take care of all this fact checking—when possible, ask a professional. It is our job to keep fake news out of your feed.


Wendy Pace is the founder of Pace Setting Media, a social media strategy agency. Pace holds a B.A. in Communications and Marketing from Hunter College. She credits her husband and children as motivation for getting up every day to face the world of social media.

How to Bring a Dying Brand Back to Life

dying brand

Can a brand come back to life? Marketers and customers have often wondered this. Well-known and successful brands like Marvel, Apple, Lego, and Volkswagen have been on the verge of dying out before turning things around. There’s even a company that has been purchasing and reviving dead brands like Brim, Nuprin, Salon Selectives, Eagle Snacks and Underalls. So how can brands achieve such a feat?

I’ve helped companies devise the following strategies that didn’t just revive their brand, but helped them grow and find success.

 

Pay Attention to Warning Signs

 

Brands can start by being vigilant, and acknowledge any problems they encounter. This way, they have a chance to pivot quickly before it’s too late. That’s where a company like Blockbuster went wrong, and where Netflix saved the day: instead of noticing that customers preferred to have movies sent to them, the chain kept building new stores rather than changing its existing model. Netflix could have followed the same direction, but the company paid attention to trends and provided the streaming subscription service that customers wanted.

If you want to prevent your brand from dying, pay close attention to shrinking customer base and revenue. If your brand is stagnant and hasn’t evolved or adapted to the changing market, competitors will appear more enticing and innovative. Be mindful of this and you can prevent your brand from ceasing to exist in the first place.

 

Tap Into Nostalgia

 

Research has shown that nostalgia can “counteract loneliness, boredom and anxiety,” make us more tolerant and generous and create a feeling of “social connectedness.” This tactic was recently used by brands like Keds, Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Polaroid when they joined in on the Twitter hashtag, #InThe90sIThought.

By tapping into the memories of your customers, you too can create a sentiment that reminds them how much they used to love your product or service. While I recommend keeping your logo, tagline, and catchy jingle, you can make other tweaks to trigger nostalgia, like vintage packaging, throwback prices, or T-shirts with an old-school logo.

 

Reboot Your Brand

 

Sometimes, the state of your brand requires a complete overhaul, especially if it recently underwent a negative experience that tarnished it in the minds of your customers. According to Fast Company, when rebooting your brand, the new design needs to signify real change and reflect the brand’s strategy and experience. I recommend staying away from anything trendy, and instead focusing on something simple that illustrates your long-term goals for the brand.

 

Bring Back Loyal Customers

 

While you need loyal customers to keep your business healthy, your brand’s near-death experience may have meant you lost business to the competition. That doesn’t mean, however, you can’t win them back as you breathe new life into your brand.  There are several ways to win back your dedicated fan base:

  • Gather feedback on why they left in the first place.
  • Offer customers incentives to come back by sending a push notification to their mobile device.
  • Reach out to customers as soon as possible, since it’s easier and more affordable to get in touch with them.
  • Send targeted, personalized emails to remind customers of their past experiences with your brand.
  • Create a sense of urgency by offering coupons, discounts or promotions for a limited time.

On top of listening and rewarding your previous customers, don’t forget to provide top-notch customer service as they make their way back to you. Amazing customer service is one of the best ways to make customers fall in love with your brand again.

 

Appeal to New Customers

 

While previous customers are your brand’s lifeblood, you may have to engage a new audience while your brand stages a comeback. I recommend using a strategy similar to when you first started your business. Be sure to interact with your audience both online and offline, whether it be sharing killer content on social media, blogging, attending networking events, offering sales promotions or free samples, or partnering up with other successful brands.

 

Use Multiple Channels

 

In today’s world, brands can’t afford to put all of their eggs in one marketing basket. Omnichannel marketing is a successful strategy I’ve implemented in order to reach customers and prospects on multiple devices, including mobile.

Google recommends that you begin by knowing who your customers are using information like their gender, demographic, location, website browsing habits, search habits, and where they shop.

 

Restore Brand Health

 

While everything I have suggested here is essential for bringing your brand back to life, it won’t just bounce back from there. Instead, there will be a recovery period where you’ll have to monitor it closely and continue implementing the above strategy. From there, you can give your brand more space to shine, but meanwhile watch out for those early warning signs so you don’t have to give your brand CPR again. It’s possible to bring your brand back from the dead, but it requires the use significant resources you’ll want to make sure to take full advantage of in the future.

 

This article originally appeared on BusinessCollective and was written by  PETER DAISYME.

 


Peter Daisyme is a special adviser to Due, an invoicing company helping small business owners transact money online.

BusinessCollective, launched in partnership with Citi, is a virtual mentorship program powered by North America’s most ambitious young thought leaders, entrepreneurs, executives and small business owners.

How to Bring a Dying Brand Back to Life

dying brand

Can a brand come back to life? Marketers and customers have often wondered this. Well-known and successful brands like Marvel, Apple, Lego, and Volkswagen have been on the verge of dying out before turning things around. There’s even a company that has been purchasing and reviving dead brands like Brim, Nuprin, Salon Selectives, Eagle Snacks and Underalls. So how can brands achieve such a feat?

I’ve helped companies devise the following strategies that didn’t just revive their brand, but helped them grow and find success.

 

Pay Attention to Warning Signs

 

Brands can start by being vigilant, and acknowledge any problems they encounter. This way, they have a chance to pivot quickly before it’s too late. That’s where a company like Blockbuster went wrong, and where Netflix saved the day: instead of noticing that customers preferred to have movies sent to them, the chain kept building new stores rather than changing its existing model. Netflix could have followed the same direction, but the company paid attention to trends and provided the streaming subscription service that customers wanted.

If you want to prevent your brand from dying, pay close attention to shrinking customer base and revenue. If your brand is stagnant and hasn’t evolved or adapted to the changing market, competitors will appear more enticing and innovative. Be mindful of this and you can prevent your brand from ceasing to exist in the first place.

 

Tap Into Nostalgia

 

Research has shown that nostalgia can “counteract loneliness, boredom and anxiety,” make us more tolerant and generous and create a feeling of “social connectedness.” This tactic was recently used by brands like Keds, Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Polaroid when they joined in on the Twitter hashtag, #InThe90sIThought.

By tapping into the memories of your customers, you too can create a sentiment that reminds them how much they used to love your product or service. While I recommend keeping your logo, tagline, and catchy jingle, you can make other tweaks to trigger nostalgia, like vintage packaging, throwback prices, or T-shirts with an old-school logo.

 

Reboot Your Brand

 

Sometimes, the state of your brand requires a complete overhaul, especially if it recently underwent a negative experience that tarnished it in the minds of your customers. According to Fast Company, when rebooting your brand, the new design needs to signify real change and reflect the brand’s strategy and experience. I recommend staying away from anything trendy, and instead focusing on something simple that illustrates your long-term goals for the brand.

 

Bring Back Loyal Customers

 

While you need loyal customers to keep your business healthy, your brand’s near-death experience may have meant you lost business to the competition. That doesn’t mean, however, you can’t win them back as you breathe new life into your brand.  There are several ways to win back your dedicated fan base:

  • Gather feedback on why they left in the first place.
  • Offer customers incentives to come back by sending a push notification to their mobile device.
  • Reach out to customers as soon as possible, since it’s easier and more affordable to get in touch with them.
  • Send targeted, personalized emails to remind customers of their past experiences with your brand.
  • Create a sense of urgency by offering coupons, discounts or promotions for a limited time.

On top of listening and rewarding your previous customers, don’t forget to provide top-notch customer service as they make their way back to you. Amazing customer service is one of the best ways to make customers fall in love with your brand again.

 

Appeal to New Customers

 

While previous customers are your brand’s lifeblood, you may have to engage a new audience while your brand stages a comeback. I recommend using a strategy similar to when you first started your business. Be sure to interact with your audience both online and offline, whether it be sharing killer content on social media, blogging, attending networking events, offering sales promotions or free samples, or partnering up with other successful brands.

 

Use Multiple Channels

 

In today’s world, brands can’t afford to put all of their eggs in one marketing basket. Omnichannel marketing is a successful strategy I’ve implemented in order to reach customers and prospects on multiple devices, including mobile.

Google recommends that you begin by knowing who your customers are using information like their gender, demographic, location, website browsing habits, search habits, and where they shop.

 

Restore Brand Health

 

While everything I have suggested here is essential for bringing your brand back to life, it won’t just bounce back from there. Instead, there will be a recovery period where you’ll have to monitor it closely and continue implementing the above strategy. From there, you can give your brand more space to shine, but meanwhile watch out for those early warning signs so you don’t have to give your brand CPR again. It’s possible to bring your brand back from the dead, but it requires the use significant resources you’ll want to make sure to take full advantage of in the future.

 

This article originally appeared on BusinessCollective and was written by  PETER DAISYME.

 


Peter Daisyme is a special adviser to Due, an invoicing company helping small business owners transact money online.

BusinessCollective, launched in partnership with Citi, is a virtual mentorship program powered by North America’s most ambitious young thought leaders, entrepreneurs, executives and small business owners.

Coach Dee Marshall Shows How to Network Your Way to Success

How to network your way to successDee C. Marshall tells you how to network your way to success Dee C. Marshall

 

 

 

 

Are you an entrepreneur looking to gain new business? Or a professional striving to climb the proverbial ladder? Dee C. Marshall has some proven strategies that can help you network your way to success.

The founder of Raise the Bar L.L.C., Marshall is a speaker, coach, and author. “Bottom line, networking can either make or break your career or business,” she says. “You must master this soft skill if you want to win.”

Marshall gave us a quick nine-step plan, for those who want to become more effective networkers:

  1. Practice your elevator speech.
  2. Be strategic, but don’t push.
  3. Focus on three to five quality connections per event.
  4. Don’t try to sell at events.
  5. Listen more, talk less.
  6. Seek to learn more about the other person.
  7. Research before attending events.
  8. Connect via LinkedIn A.S.A.P.
  9. Write reminders on the back of business cards you collect.

Next week, Marshall will be facilitating the session Power Suite: Meet, Mix, Match, hosted by ADP, at the Women of Power Summit, March 9-12 in Phoenix. There, she’ll help professionals create a network of peers that will help them get to the C-Suite.

“Your peers extend your reach/network, and increase your knowledge bank account,” Marshall says, while explaining why it’s important to build your own Power Suite. “They are first-tier circle of influence that can make or break a deal. One day, they’ll be a decision maker or influencer in your path.”

Marshall joined Black Enterprise for a Twitter chat, on February 23, to share her tips. Whether you’re a novice at networking, or more experienced but looking to elevate your game, she’s got the goods to help you network your way to success.

Here are some of the highlights:


How to Remain Consistent in Business So You Can Earn More

consistent

One of my coaching clients recently mentioned to me how she had a hard time remaining consistent in business. She felt like this was the biggest deterrents to earning more money and she wasn’t sure how to go about changing that.

Before getting into that, I want to explain how there’s a difference between being human and not being consistent in business. Being human means you’re tired and you need to take a break. That’s fine and perfectly normal.

However, having a problem with being consistent in business may look like any of the following:

  • Not prioritizing your business by not giving it the time it deserves.
  • Avoiding situations in business that may scare you.
  • Not committing.

In this article, I’m going to teach you how to address all three so you can finally remain consistent in business.

 

1: Start giving your business the priority it deserves.

 

Look, I get that we’re all busy people. We have kids or other family members that need our help. We also have obligations as well as stuff we’d like to do. However, if you want to finally remain consistent in business you’re going to have to actually prioritize it.

In the case of my coaching client, she realized she needed her own space so that she could actually get some work done. Since she’d given her home office to her husband’s assistant, she actually decided to join a local coworking space.

Giving your business the priority it deserves may also look like getting help for non-business related things. I know plenty of business owners who have nannies, can’t live without a cleaning lady and use grocery delivery services. It’s not because they are rolling in the dough, it’s because they are freeing up their time so they can focus on the business.

 

2. Stop letting fear take over.

 

Fear is a nasty little bugger. We have fear of being seen as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome), fear of not being liked and fear of failure.

Often times people are waiting for the fear to go away before they decide to be consistent in business. They want to know everything will work out.

Well, here’s a little newsflash for you: The fear is never going to go away. The best we can do is learn how to manage our fears so we can continue moving forward.

I do tons of things to keep my fear at bay including meditation, yoga and working with coaches. This ensures that I keep it moving regardless of how scared I am.

 

3. Actually commit

 

The biggest struggle I see among business owners is a lack of commitment. The lack of commitment usually comes from some sort of fear like the ones mentioned above.

The reality is that if you want to finally remain consistent in business you’re going to have to actually commit to it.

There is no dipping your toes in the water. There is no one foot in and one foot out. And there certainly isn’t a system for making a million dollars working only four hours a week (at least not in the beginning).

If you want to be consistent in business and actually reap the benefits of that, you’ll need to actually commit to it just like you’d commit to a partner or commit to getting healthy.

 

This article was written by  and originally appeared on DUE.com.


Amanda Abella is a full-time writer who specializes in online business and finance. She’s also an online business coach and the Amazon best-selling author of Make Money Your Honey.

Due is a payments, eCash, online invoicing, time tracking, global payments, and digital wallet solution for freelancers, small business owners, and companies of all sizes.