This Week in Tech Racism, March 25, 2017

racism

In the mix of racism and technology this week: Advertisers are getting fed up with hateful content on YouTube; social media flogs artist for tone-deaf painting; little kids are racially taunted after becoming champs at a robotics competition; and more.

 

Black and Latino Kids Win Robotics Competition; Subjected to Racist Jeers

 

A group of black and Latino 9 and 10-year-olds were taunted and told to “go back to Mexico” after winning a robotics competition, reports USA Today. The group, kids from the Pleasant Run Elementary school in Indianapolis remained undaunted by the racist remarks and were excited about their victory. “”When you have a really good team, people will treat you this way,” said one of the kids.

 

There Were No Africans at the African Global Economic and Development Summit

 

The Guardian featured a story on last week’s African Global Economic and Development Summit held in California. The article noted the stunning lack of African people at the conference. The reason cited was that all of the African citizens who had requested visas had been denied.

 

Social Media Goes after White Artist’s Emmett Till Painting

 

Twitter was on fire after a white artist, Dana Schutz, had her painting of Emmett Till on display at the Whitney Biennial. The artwork, called “Open Casket,” was a rendering of the boy’s remains in his casket based on the famous picture taken at his funeral. “”She has nothing to say to the black community about black trauma,” read one of the many Twitter posts criticizing the artist and her work. Many across social media felt that she was exploiting African American suffering.

 

Big Companies Continue to Pull Ads from Racist and Hateful YouTube Videos

 

Google’s YouTube service stands to lose a significant amount of advertising revenue. Companies including AT&T and Verizon are concerned with their ads appearing on YouTube videos with racist and other inflammatory content, reports Recode.

 

How to Watch Black Enterprise’s New Tech Podcast on Any Device

podcast

BE The Code is a new podcast on all things tech, hosted by Sequoia Blodgett, Black Enterprise’s tech editor in Silicon Valley. The podcast explores matters related to technology that are important to African Americans and those within the African diaspora. The podcast lets the audience in on winning strategies and game-changing advice from Silicon Valley’s top innovators, celebrities, and rising stars.

Blodgett is a tech entrepreneur with insight and access to the venture capital scene. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform focused on personal development guided by informed pop culture.

Now available on iTunes, you can also access the podcast across any device. The episodes are available on SoundCloud and YouTube.

The first episode features Monique Woodard, a venture partner at 500 Startups. Rodney Williams, founder and CEO of LISNR, stopped by for the second episode. Williams provides insight into how he raised over $14 million in VC funding, while living outside of the tech capital of the world.

“In the forthcoming days, we’re going to expound on some of the subject matter discussed in this episode. We will teach you exactly how to pitch, what to say, and we’ll go into detail on when or if you should be seeking venture capital in the first place,” says Blodgett.

You can check out the episode on YouTube at the below links:





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Diversity Network Highlights Tech’s Top 40 Under 40

Image: Tiffany Price

Recently, the Digital Diversity Network made an unforgettable splash in Silicon Valley. First with an event held at the YouTube space, highlighting phenomenal women of color in technology and then culminating with the, 40 Under 40 – Tech Diversity – Silicon Valley, Awards held at Salesforce. Awardees graced the stage ranging from tech moguls to Facebook execs to the Bay Area’s social impact giant, Kapor Capital.

In case you missed it, without further ado, here are the top 40 Under 40, currently making waves in Tech Diversity in Silicon Valley.

NAME TITLE         COMPANY
1 Aaron Russell Sourcing Manager, Networking Engineering Facebook
2 Adjetey Clarence Lassey Enterprise Corporate Solutions Executive Salesforce.com
3 Albert Biketi VP & GM, Data Security Hewlett Packard Enterprise Software
4 Alexandria Lafci Co-Founder New Story Charity
5 Anita Blanco Director of Diversity & Inclusion in Genetics & Biosciences Stanford University
6 Bernard Gutmann Director, Corporate Strategy & Development Pandora
7 Breanna Zwart Policy & Partnerships, Emerging Markets Google
8 Brian Martinez Global Program Manager, Field Sales Airbnb
9 Darrell Jones, III Head of Business Development Clef
10 David Silva Founder Techqueria.org
11 Ebony Frelix SVP, Philanthropy & Engagement Salesforce.com
12 Erica Joy Baker Build & Release Engineer Slack
13 Idalin Bobe IT Consultant | Social Justice Activist | Community Manager Thoughtworks
14 Jamal Eason Product Manager Google
15 Jason Mayden Founder, CEO, Designer Accel Partners
16 Jason Towns CEO & Managing Director Groundwork
17 Joe Vasquez Founding Director Michelson Runway Accelerator
18 Julia Collins Co-Founder and Co-CEO Zume Pizza
19 Justin Steele Principal Google.org
20 Kamilah Taylor Senior Software Engineer LinkedIn
21 Lajuanda Asemota Director for Diversity & Inclusion Singularity University
22 Lance Coleman Content & Venture Advisor Binary Capital
23 Laura Gomez CEO Atipica
24 Leandrew Robinson CEO & Co-founder Hingeto
25 Lilibeth Gangas Chief Technology Community Officer Kapor Center for Social Impact
26 Maci Peterson Co-founder & CEO On Second Thought, Inc.
27 Maisha Gray-Diggs Group Manager, Litter/Coal Innovation The Clorox Company
28 Makinde Adeagbo Founder & CEO /dev/color
29 Mandela Schumacher-Hodge Founding Portfolio Services Director Kapor Capital
30 Megan Rose Dickey Reporter TechCrunch
31 Mercedes Bent Vice President of Education Upload VR
32 Monique Woodard Venture Partner 500 Startups
33 Morgan DeBaun CEO & Founder Blavity
34 Robert Harmon, Jr. Deputy General Counsel & Director Tesla Motors, Inc.
35 Sean Heywood Product Partnerships – Messenger Facebook
36 Shauntel Poulson Co-Founder and General Partner Reach Capital
37 Tiffani Ashley Bell Executive Director The Human Utility (formerly Detroit Water Project)
38 Trevor Thomas General Partner Cross Culture Ventures
39 Tristan Walker Founder & CEO Walker & Co.
40 Wilson White Senior Counsel, Public Policy & Government Relations Google

 

In addition to this list, Marc Hannah, Ph.D., was presented with the Game Changer of the Year Award and Rachel Williams, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Yelp, was presented with the Influencer Award, presented by Digital Diversity Network COO Kathy A. Johnson. During her acceptance speech, Williams promptly gave credit back to her fellow Awardees, “Everybody who stands before me in this room is an influencer. We are all changing the game.”

 

 

 


Sequoia Sequoia Blodgett is the Technology Editor for Black Enterprise, Silicon Valley. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform, focused on personal development, guided by informed, pop culture.

YouTube Hosts Women of Color in Technology Luncheon

Technology LuncheonTechnology Luncheon [Emily Nishi, Nicole Alston, Lili Gangas, Kayra Hopkins, Alexandria Lafci, Co-Founder of New Story and Monique Woodard (Image: Black Enterprise/Sequoia Blodgett)]

 

Women are slowly but surely killin’ the tech game and, of course, when we come together we are that much more powerful. This past week, YouTube hosted the Women of Color in Technology Luncheon, put on by the Digital Diversity Network and it was super refreshing to be in a room full of supportive women sharing their tech stories and encouraging each other to thrive.

The reception was interspersed with a panel including some of tech’s finest: Emily Nishi, director of People Operations, YouTube; Nicole Alston, VP Legal – YouTube; Lili Gangas, chief technology community officer at Kapor Center for Social Impact; Kayra Hopkins, technical director at Pixar Animation Studios; Alexandria Lafci, co-founder of New Story; and Monique Woodard, partner at 500 Startups.

Each woman had powerful advice to spread, but what resonated with me were their 60-second lighting answers when asked by moderator Emily Nishi to impart words of wisdom when it comes to breaking into the technology industry.

Gangas talked about finding those champions within your organization, field, or industry and connecting with them as allies. Not only will they be champions for you, it will encourage you to want to be the champion for someone else.

Woodard pointed out that you can’t be what you can’t see, so role models are extremely important, but don’t be afraid to go where no one has gone. In some cases, you have to blaze your own path, so take that risk.

Honorable mention goes to her quote from earlier in the conversation. “Tech bros are people too.” She encourages you to step outside of your own circle, and connect with people who don’t look like you.

Lafci, visited the concept of the rising tide. “A rising tide raises all ships. At YC, everyone lifted each other up.” She encourages you to look out for each other and be an advocate.

Hopkins, who is also effectively the first black female technical director at Pixar, wants you to work efficiently in the inclusion space. “Include more people in the work that you are doing. Don’t be shy about it. If no one knows what you are working on, they won’t know that you are the person to look to when it’s time to get that raise.”

Alston says, “Don’t be afraid to take risks. Do something that scares you every day. It’s OK to make a mistake. Take the risk and make the mistake.”

 

 

 


SequoiaSequoia Blodgett is the Technology Editor for Black Enterprise, Silicon Valley. She is also the founder of 7AM, a lifestyle, media platform, focused on personal development, guided by informed, pop culture.

What I Learned From Starting a Business From Scratch

business

I’m a young entrepreneur, a YouTube vlogger, and a beauty addict by nature. I started a business from scratch, and have seen it grow over the last five years. We are now a team of 14 women based all over the world. If you had told me a few years ago that this would be my life, I would have laughed. But, that’s exactly why I want to inspire other women, and let them know that, if you have a dream, you should go for it!

Here are five things I’ve learned about running a business:

There Is No “Right” Time

 

A lot of people think that there’s a right time for something. “I’m not ready” is always the excuse—I’m not ready to quit my job, I’m not ready until I get my MBA, I’m not ready until I can pay off my car. But, life is never going to open its doors and wait for you. Do you think an Olympic diver is ever ready to jump off the high-dive backwards? They just go for it. The same is true in business. You are never completely ready. You just have to take the plunge. I wasn’t ready for a lot of surprises in my business, but I trust that I’m smart enough to figure them out as they come.

It’s Empowering to Have a Team Full of Women

 

I never set out to have an all-female company. It just happened based on the hires who were the best cultural fit. I was originally apprehensive because of the “mean girl” stereotype of having too many women working together. However, I realized that that’s a cultural misappropriation reinforced by movies and TV shows. At work, that’s never the case. We all get along very well and treat each other with respect. It’s pretty cool to see ladies supporting each other and wanting the company to succeed. Running a business has changed my personality and who I am. It has influenced my perspective on girl power and what it means to have a team of ladies—smart, creative, and passionate.

No Health, No Wealth

 

Avoid getting sick at all costs. Getting sick not only feels miserable, it’s also a loss of productivity. For example, on my flight back from Asia last year, I came down with the flu for three weeks. I assume it was because I booked my travel plans too tightly, didn’t take the time to sleep, didn’t eat healthy foods, and just forgot to relax, because I was constantly in “go, go, go” mode. Being out for three weeks meant a huge loss of money and productivity, so now I do my best to avoid getting sick at all costs. Keep your health a priority. Eat fruits and vegetables, take vitamin C, and get enough sleep. Everyone thinks entrepreneurs work for 20 hours a day. That’s not sustainable, and not even possible. Prioritize your health, because without good health, you won’t be able to create wealth or enjoy that wealth.

Read more at www.businesscollective.com…

Daisy Jing founded and bootstrapped beauty product line, Banish. Her team is on a mission to inspire women through their products.

BusinessCollective, launched in partnership with Citi, is a virtual mentorship program powered by North America’s most ambitious young thought leaders, entrepreneurs, executives, and small business owners.

How to Get Your Marketing Content Thousands of Views on YouTube

Youtube

Almost one-third of all Internet users watch YouTube, streaming hundreds of millions of hours of content every day. In the United States alone, adults spent an average of five and a half hours with video content each day, in 2015.

The numbers alone make it a no-brainer; if you have the medium to market your business, filling up a YouTube channel with content should be on your to-do list. Every business wants virality—whether it’s in the form of a meme, video, or image—to catapult brand awareness and boost sales. But, how do you stand out from the 300 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute?

As the founder and CEO of GYMGUYZ, an in-home mobile personal training company, I presented a challenge to myself and to my company: create a successful viral marketing video to generate more sales leads. For GYMGUYZ, creating our final masterpiece (“Shake it Off,” a GYMGUYZ Parody) came down to four simple rules:

Get Creative

There’s no easy answer or quick trick to creating an instant success. Hoping to find guidance in a viral video playbook is the same as reading an instruction manual on how to win the lottery. But, if there’s one thing all of these videos have in common, it’s good, original content that captures the imagination.

How could we make a splash in a sea of mediocre uploads? With more cat videos, Adele song covers, and makeup tutorials than the world knows what to do with, we had to come up with a concept that could stand out. So, we had a bunch of adults sing and dance to one of the most popular teen sensations around, Taylor Swift. But, instead of a straight cover, we wrote up our own lyrics to represent our company culture: working out and getting in shape.

Read more at www.businesscollective.com…

Josh York is the Founder and CEO of GYMGUYZ, an in-home mobile personal training company headquarted in Plainview, New York. Since its inception in 2008, Josh has been valued for his hands on leadership style growing the business and profitability to more than 1000 clients, 45 employees and a fleet of vans in less than six years.

BusinessCollective, launched in partnership with Citi, is a virtual mentorship program powered by North America’s most ambitious young thought leaders, entrepreneurs, executives and small business owners.

Want a Good Job After Graduation?

What’s the No. 1 hard skill hiring managers want to see in new hires—but don’t? Writing proficiency, according to a new report from PayScale, a provider of on-demand compensation data and software, produced in partnership with Future Workplace, an executive development firm.

The No. 1 soft skill? Critical thinking or problem solving.

The report reveals that nearly 90% of recent graduates feel well prepared to succeed in the workplace; however, only half of hiring managers agree.

As the mother of a 2015 college graduate, I agree with the hiring managers. My daughter is bright, energetic—but still essentially green.

Helpfully, the report, Leveling Up: How to Win In the Skills Economy, reveals the skills managers are looking for that many college graduates don’t have. It also identifies which skills command the biggest paychecks or are most likely to earn a promotion.

“Graduates need strong communication and problem-solving skills if they want to interview well and succeed in the workplace, because effective writing, speaking, and critical thinking enables you to accomplish business goals and get ahead,” Dan Schawbel, research director at Future Workplace, said in a statement, according to Fast Company. “No working day will be complete without writing an e-mail or tackling a new challenge, so the sooner you develop these skills, the more employable you will become.”

Other hard skills included on the list? Public speaking, data analysis, and math skills. Important soft skills hiring managers find elusive include attention to detail, communication, and ownership.

Reading the Vocations column in Sunday’s Times, I was struck by the career trajectory of the subject in the piece. A former English major, Jaime DeLanghe attributes her success to hard work, but I would credit her curiosity (also on the list of soft skills hiring managers find missing).

“I’m not happy if I don’t understand something, so I read books and took online classes,” DeLanghe, now a senior product manager, is quoted as saying.

She filled the holes in her experience and knowledge base with learning. You can do that too.

Here are a few ways you can close your own personal skills gaps and develop into an attractive candidate to a hiring manager or become promotable at work:

  • Take responsibility for closing the gaps. If you’re missing skills on the list, acquire them by taking online courses, consulting friends or colleagues that are skilled in an area you’re not, read books, attend meetups.
  • Conquer public speaking with Toastmasters.
  • Develop math skills with Khan Academy or other math courses on YouTube.

Most importantly, keep at it. (After all, it took at least four years to get to graduation.) You can close gaps in your education or experience; it simply takes time and perseverance.

Want a Good Job After Graduation?

What’s the No. 1 hard skill hiring managers want to see in new hires—but don’t? Writing proficiency, according to a new report from PayScale, a provider of on-demand compensation data and software, produced in partnership with Future Workplace, an executive development firm.

The No. 1 soft skill? Critical thinking or problem solving.

The report reveals that nearly 90% of recent graduates feel well prepared to succeed in the workplace; however, only half of hiring managers agree.

As the mother of a 2015 college graduate, I agree with the hiring managers. My daughter is bright, energetic—but still essentially green.

Helpfully, the report, Leveling Up: How to Win In the Skills Economy, reveals the skills managers are looking for that many college graduates don’t have. It also identifies which skills command the biggest paychecks or are most likely to earn a promotion.

“Graduates need strong communication and problem-solving skills if they want to interview well and succeed in the workplace, because effective writing, speaking, and critical thinking enables you to accomplish business goals and get ahead,” Dan Schawbel, research director at Future Workplace, said in a statement, according to Fast Company. “No working day will be complete without writing an e-mail or tackling a new challenge, so the sooner you develop these skills, the more employable you will become.”

Other hard skills included on the list? Public speaking, data analysis, and math skills. Important soft skills hiring managers find elusive include attention to detail, communication, and ownership.

Reading the Vocations column in Sunday’s Times, I was struck by the career trajectory of the subject in the piece. A former English major, Jaime DeLanghe attributes her success to hard work, but I would credit her curiosity (also on the list of soft skills hiring managers find missing).

“I’m not happy if I don’t understand something, so I read books and took online classes,” DeLanghe, now a senior product manager, is quoted as saying.

She filled the holes in her experience and knowledge base with learning. You can do that too.

Here are a few ways you can close your own personal skills gaps and develop into an attractive candidate to a hiring manager or become promotable at work:

  • Take responsibility for closing the gaps. If you’re missing skills on the list, acquire them by taking online courses, consulting friends or colleagues that are skilled in an area you’re not, read books, attend meetups.
  • Conquer public speaking with Toastmasters.
  • Develop math skills with Khan Academy or other math courses on YouTube.

Most importantly, keep at it. (After all, it took at least four years to get to graduation.) You can close gaps in your education or experience; it simply takes time and perseverance.

Want a Good Job After Graduation?

What’s the No. 1 hard skill hiring managers want to see in new hires—but don’t? Writing proficiency, according to a new report from PayScale, a provider of on-demand compensation data and software, produced in partnership with Future Workplace, an executive development firm.

The No. 1 soft skill? Critical thinking or problem solving.

The report reveals that nearly 90% of recent graduates feel well prepared to succeed in the workplace; however, only half of hiring managers agree.

As the mother of a 2015 college graduate, I agree with the hiring managers. My daughter is bright, energetic—but still essentially green.

Helpfully, the report, Leveling Up: How to Win In the Skills Economy, reveals the skills managers are looking for that many college graduates don’t have. It also identifies which skills command the biggest paychecks or are most likely to earn a promotion.

“Graduates need strong communication and problem-solving skills if they want to interview well and succeed in the workplace, because effective writing, speaking, and critical thinking enables you to accomplish business goals and get ahead,” Dan Schawbel, research director at Future Workplace, said in a statement, according to Fast Company. “No working day will be complete without writing an e-mail or tackling a new challenge, so the sooner you develop these skills, the more employable you will become.”

Other hard skills included on the list? Public speaking, data analysis, and math skills. Important soft skills hiring managers find elusive include attention to detail, communication, and ownership.

Reading the Vocations column in Sunday’s Times, I was struck by the career trajectory of the subject in the piece. A former English major, Jaime DeLanghe attributes her success to hard work, but I would credit her curiosity (also on the list of soft skills hiring managers find missing).

“I’m not happy if I don’t understand something, so I read books and took online classes,” DeLanghe, now a senior product manager, is quoted as saying.

She filled the holes in her experience and knowledge base with learning. You can do that too.

Here are a few ways you can close your own personal skills gaps and develop into an attractive candidate to a hiring manager or become promotable at work:

  • Take responsibility for closing the gaps. If you’re missing skills on the list, acquire them by taking online courses, consulting friends or colleagues that are skilled in an area you’re not, read books, attend meetups.
  • Conquer public speaking with Toastmasters.
  • Develop math skills with Khan Academy or other math courses on YouTube.

Most importantly, keep at it. (After all, it took at least four years to get to graduation.) You can close gaps in your education or experience; it simply takes time and perseverance.

Cable-Cutters Rejoice: TiVo Gets a Makeover

Starting Monday, May 2, the all-new TiVo Roamio OTA will feature a hefty 1TB hard drive, and carries no requirement for an on-going monthly subscription fee.

[Related: #WisdomWednesday: How to Game Your Cable Company]

“The TiVo Roamio OTA 1TB is in a class of its own,” said Ira Bahr, TiVo’s Chief Marketing and Retail Sales Officer. “It delivers the unparalleled TiVo DVR experience, as well as an intuitive integration between free over-the-air HD channels and major streaming services. No other device brings everything you watch together into one single, easy-to-use interface.”

The TiVo Roamio is a cable cutters dream now, with more storage and no subscription fee. With it, you can hook your TV cable to it, and record your favorite broadcast shows.

The Roamio also connects to Internet broadband via an Ethernet cable or Wi-Fi. The device works with either FIOS, digital cable, or an HD antenna.

With its 1TB of storage, it can record up to 150 hours of high-definition programming and up to four shows at once.

The TiVo also gives users access to their content and subscriptions from Internet video services including Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Instant Video, and YouTube.

Some key features are:

SkipMode: Allows users to skip commercial breaks of recorded shows with the press of a single button.

QuickMode: Watch recordings 30% faster with pitch-corrected audio.

OneSearch: Search across local channels and Internet video services to find which shows are available and where they can be found.

Casting: Cast your favorite Netflix and YouTube video from your mobile device to the TiVo Roamio without need to buy a Chromecast dongle since casting is built-in.

Tru Multi-Room Video: Works with the industry-leading TiVo Minis. Live, recorded, and Over-the-Top (OTT) content with the same interface on every TV in your home, including power features such as SkipMode.

Compatibility with TiVo Stream: Stream and download live and recorded TV to iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, both in and out of homes. Or watch recorded shows on an Amazon Fire TV or Apple TV in another room of your home.

Web Apps: MLB, Pandora, Spotify are all supported.

Free mobile application: Manage your recordings on your TiVo Roamio through remote OnePass management.

The TiVo Roamio OTA 1TB is available for $399, a one-time payment including TiVo service. The Roamio will be available May 2, 2016, at TiVo.com, BestBuy.com, and Amazon.com, and at participating Best Buy stores.